Ten Lessons for a Post-Pandemic World

Ten Lessons for a Post-Pandemic World
Author: Fareed Zakaria
Publsiher: W. W. Norton & Company
Total Pages: 320
Release: 2020-10-06
ISBN 10: 0393542149
ISBN 13: 9780393542141
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Ten Lessons for a Post-Pandemic World Book Review:

COVID-19 is speeding up history, but how? What is the shape of the world to come? Lenin once said, "There are decades when nothing happens and weeks when decades happen." This is one of those times when history has sped up. CNN host and best-selling author Fareed Zakaria helps readers to understand the nature of a post-pandemic world: the political, social, technological, and economic consequences that may take years to unfold. Written in the form of ten "lessons," covering topics from natural and biological risks to the rise of "digital life" to an emerging bipolar world order, Zakaria helps readers to begin thinking beyond the immediate effects of COVID-19. Ten Lessons for a Post-Pandemic World speaks to past, present, and future, and, while urgent and timely, is sure to become an enduring reflection on life in the early twenty-first century.

Ten Lessons for a Post-Pandemic World

Ten Lessons for a Post-Pandemic World
Author: Fareed Zakaria
Publsiher: Penguin UK
Total Pages: 320
Release: 2020-10-06
ISBN 10: 0241491673
ISBN 13: 9780241491676
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Ten Lessons for a Post-Pandemic World Book Review:

Since the end of the Cold War, the world has been shaken to its core three times. 11 September 2001, the financial collapse of 2008 and - most of all - Covid-19. Each was an asymmetric threat, set in motion by something seemingly small, and different from anything the world had experienced before. Lenin is supposed to have said, 'There are decades when nothing happens and weeks when decades happen.' This is one of those times when history has sped up. In this urgent and timely book, Fareed Zakaria, one of the 'top ten global thinkers of the last decade' (Foreign Policy), foresees the nature of a post-pandemic world: the political, social, technological and economic consequences that may take years to unfold. In ten surprising, hopeful 'lessons', he writes about the acceleration of natural and biological risks, the obsolescence of the old political categories of right and left, the rise of 'digital life', the future of globalization and an emerging world order split between the United States and China. He invites us to think about how we are truly social animals with community embedded in our nature, and, above all, the degree to which nothing is written - the future is truly in our own hands. Ten Lessons for a Post-Pandemic World speaks to past, present and future, and will become an enduring reflection on life in the early twenty-first century.

Ten Lessons for a Post-Pandemic World

Ten Lessons for a Post-Pandemic World
Author: Fareed Zakaria
Publsiher:
Total Pages: 224
Release: 2020-10-13
ISBN 10: 9780241491652
ISBN 13: 0241491657
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Ten Lessons for a Post-Pandemic World Book Review:

The Future of Freedom: Illiberal Democracy at Home and Abroad (Revised Edition)

The Future of Freedom: Illiberal Democracy at Home and Abroad (Revised Edition)
Author: Fareed Zakaria
Publsiher: W. W. Norton & Company
Total Pages: 304
Release: 2007-10-17
ISBN 10: 9780393069396
ISBN 13: 0393069397
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

The Future of Freedom: Illiberal Democracy at Home and Abroad (Revised Edition) Book Review:

“A work of tremendous originality and insight. ... Makes you see the world differently.”—Washington Post Translated into twenty languages ?The Future of Freedom ?is a modern classic that uses historical analysis to shed light on the present, examining how democracy has changed our politics, economies, and social relations. Prescient in laying out the distinction between democracy and liberty, the book contains a new afterword on the United States's occupation of Iraq and a wide-ranging update of the book's themes.

In Defense of a Liberal Education

In Defense of a Liberal Education
Author: Fareed Zakaria
Publsiher: W. W. Norton & Company
Total Pages: 176
Release: 2015-03-30
ISBN 10: 0393247694
ISBN 13: 9780393247695
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

In Defense of a Liberal Education Book Review:

CNN host and best-selling author Fareed Zakaria argues for a renewed commitment to the world’s most valuable educational tradition. The liberal arts are under attack. The governors of Florida, Texas, and North Carolina have all pledged that they will not spend taxpayer money subsidizing the liberal arts, and they seem to have an unlikely ally in President Obama. While at a General Electric plant in early 2014, Obama remarked, "I promise you, folks can make a lot more, potentially, with skilled manufacturing or the trades than they might with an art history degree." These messages are hitting home: majors like English and history, once very popular and highly respected, are in steep decline. "I get it," writes Fareed Zakaria, recalling the atmosphere in India where he grew up, which was even more obsessed with getting a skills-based education. However, the CNN host and best-selling author explains why this widely held view is mistaken and shortsighted. Zakaria eloquently expounds on the virtues of a liberal arts education—how to write clearly, how to express yourself convincingly, and how to think analytically. He turns our leaders' vocational argument on its head. American routine manufacturing jobs continue to get automated or outsourced, and specific vocational knowledge is often outdated within a few years. Engineering is a great profession, but key value-added skills you will also need are creativity, lateral thinking, design, communication, storytelling, and, more than anything, the ability to continually learn and enjoy learning—precisely the gifts of a liberal education. Zakaria argues that technology is transforming education, opening up access to the best courses and classes in a vast variety of subjects for millions around the world. We are at the dawn of the greatest expansion of the idea of a liberal education in human history.

The Internet in Everything

The Internet in Everything
Author: Laura DeNardis
Publsiher:
Total Pages: 288
Release: 2020-01-07
ISBN 10: 0300233078
ISBN 13: 9780300233070
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

The Internet in Everything Book Review:

A compelling argument that the Internet of things threatens human rights and security and that suggests policy prescriptions to protect our future The Internet has leapt from human-facing display screens into the material objects all around us. In this so-called Internet of Things--connecting everything from cars to cardiac monitors to home appliances--there is no longer a meaningful distinction between physical and virtual worlds. Everything is connected. The social and economic benefits are tremendous, but there is a downside: an outage in cyberspace can result not only in a loss of communication but also potentially a loss of life. Control of this infrastructure has become a proxy for political power, since countries can easily reach across borders to disrupt real-world systems. Laura DeNardis argues that this diffusion of the Internet into the physical world radically escalates governance concerns around privacy, discrimination, human safety, democracy, and national security, and she offers new cyber-policy solutions. In her discussion, she makes visible the sinews of power already embedded in our technology and explores how hidden technical governance arrangements will become the constitution of our future.

From Wealth to Power

From Wealth to Power
Author: Fareed Zakaria
Publsiher: Princeton University Press
Total Pages: 216
Release: 1999-07-26
ISBN 10: 9781400829187
ISBN 13: 1400829186
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

From Wealth to Power Book Review:

What turns rich nations into great powers? How do wealthy countries begin extending their influence abroad? These questions are vital to understanding one of the most important sources of instability in international politics: the emergence of a new power. In From Wealth to Power, Fareed Zakaria seeks to answer these questions by examining the most puzzling case of a rising power in modern history--that of the United States. If rich nations routinely become great powers, Zakaria asks, then how do we explain the strange inactivity of the United States in the late nineteenth century? By 1885, the U.S. was the richest country in the world. And yet, by all military, political, and diplomatic measures, it was a minor power. To explain this discrepancy, Zakaria considers a wide variety of cases between 1865 and 1908 when the U.S. considered expanding its influence in such diverse places as Canada, the Dominican Republic, and Iceland. Consistent with the realist theory of international relations, he argues that the President and his administration tried to increase the country's political influence abroad when they saw an increase in the nation's relative economic power. But they frequently had to curtail their plans for expansion, he shows, because they lacked a strong central government that could harness that economic power for the purposes of foreign policy. America was an unusual power--a strong nation with a weak state. It was not until late in the century, when power shifted from states to the federal government and from the legislative to the executive branch, that leaders in Washington could mobilize the nation's resources for international influence. Zakaria's exploration of this tension between national power and state structure will change how we view the emergence of new powers and deepen our understanding of America's exceptional history.

Black Site: The CIA in the Post-9/11 World

Black Site: The CIA in the Post-9/11 World
Author: Philip Mudd
Publsiher: Liveright Publishing
Total Pages: 288
Release: 2019-07-30
ISBN 10: 1631491989
ISBN 13: 9781631491986
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Black Site: The CIA in the Post-9/11 World Book Review:

A bold account of one of the most controversial and haunting initiatives in American history, Black Site tells the full story of the post-9/11 counterterrorism world at the CIA. When the towers fell on September 11, 2001, nowhere were the reverberations more powerfully felt than at CIA headquarters in Langley, Virginia. Almost overnight, the intelligence organization evolved into a warfighting intelligence service, constructing what was known internally as “the Program”: a web of top-secret detention facilities intended to help prevent future attacks on American soil and around the world. With Black Site, former deputy director of the CIA Counterterrorist Center Philip Mudd presents a full, never-before-told story of this now-controversial program, directly addressing how far America went to pursue al-Qa’ida and prevent another catastrophe. Heated debates about torture were later ignited in 2014 after the US Senate published a report of the Program, detailing the CIA’s use of “enhanced interrogation techniques” to draw information from detainees. The report, Mudd posits, did not fully address key questions: How did the officials actually come to their decisions? What happened at the detention facilities—known as “Black Sites”—on a day-to-day basis? What did they look like? How were prisoners transported there? And how did the officers feel about what they were doing? Black Site seeks answers to these questions and more, first by examining pre-9/11 Langley, when the CIA was tasked with collecting, disseminating, and analyzing information related to overseas events. Mudd argues that September 12, 2001, marked an operational revolution, as officials suddenly felt the weight of protecting a nation from a second wave of attacks inside the United States. Re-creating the incredibly tense atmosphere of the time, Mudd reveals that many officials felt an unshakable personal responsibility to thwart another attack. Based on interviews from dozens of officials—many of whom have never spoken out before— Black Site illuminates how the Agency quickly stepped into the process of organizing a full-blown interrogation program. Mudd offers a deeper understanding of how the enhanced interrogation techniques were developed and how intelligence professionals prepared to talk to the world’s most hardened terrorists. With careful detail, he takes us through the process of each legally approved technique, including waterboarding. As compelling as it is revelatory, Black Site shows us the tragedy and triumph of the CIA during its most difficult days.

Kenny & the Dragon

Kenny & the Dragon
Author: Tony DiTerlizzi
Publsiher: Simon and Schuster
Total Pages: 176
Release: 2012-01-24
ISBN 10: 1442436514
ISBN 13: 9781442436510
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Kenny & the Dragon Book Review:

Book-loving Kenny the rabbit has few friends in his farming community, so when one, bookstore owner George, is sent to kill another, gentle dragon Grahame, Kenny must find a way to prevent their battle while satisfying the dragon-crazed townspeople.

The Fragile Earth

The Fragile Earth
Author: David Remnick,Henry Finder
Publsiher: HarperCollins
Total Pages: 560
Release: 2020-10-06
ISBN 10: 0063017563
ISBN 13: 9780063017566
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

The Fragile Earth Book Review:

A collection of the New Yorker’s groundbreaking reporting from the front lines of climate change—including writing from Bill McKibben, Elizabeth Kolbert, Ian Frazier, Kathryn Schulz, and more Just one year after climatologist James Hansen first came before a Senate committee and testified that the Earth was now warmer than it had ever been in recorded history, thanks to humankind’s heedless consumption of fossil fuels, New Yorker writer Bill McKibben published a deeply reported and considered piece on climate change and what it could mean for the planet. At the time, the piece was to some speculative to the point of alarmist; read now, McKibben’s work is heroically prescient. Since then, the New Yorker has devoted enormous attention to climate change, describing the causes of the crisis, the political and ecological conditions we now find ourselves in, and the scenarios and solutions we face. The Fragile Earth tells the story of climate change—its past, present, and future—taking readers from Greenland to the Great Plains, and into both laboratories and rain forests. It features some of the best writing on global warming from the last three decades, including Bill McKibben’s seminal essay “The End of Nature,” the first piece to popularize both the science and politics of climate change for a general audience, and the Pulitzer Prize–winning work of Elizabeth Kolbert, as well as Kathryn Schulz, Dexter Filkins, Jonathan Franzen, Ian Frazier, Eric Klinenberg, and others. The result, in its range, depth, and passion, promises to bring light, and sometimes heat, to the great emergency of our age.

Camp Girls

Camp Girls
Author: Iris Krasnow
Publsiher: Grand Central Publishing
Total Pages: 256
Release: 2020-04-07
ISBN 10: 1538732246
ISBN 13: 9781538732243
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Camp Girls Book Review:

New York Times bestselling author Iris Krasnow reflects with humor and heart on her summer camp experiences and the lessons she and her fellow campers learned there that have stayed with them throughout their lives. Iris Krasnow was 8 years old when she first attended sleep-away camp, building lasting friendships and essential life skills amid the towering pine trees and open skies of Wisconsin. Decades later, she returned to Camp Agawak as a staff member to help resurrect Agalog, the camp's defunct magazine that she wrote for as a child. There, she revisits the activities she loved as a young girl: singing songs around a campfire, swimming in a pristine lake, sleeping under the stars-experiences that continue to fill her with wisdom and perspective. A nostalgic, inspiring memoir with a universal message on the importance of long-term friendship for campers and non-campers alike, Camp Girls weaves between past and present, filling the page in delicious detail with cabin pranks, canoe trips in rainstorms, and the joy of finding both your independence and your interdependence in nature alongside your peers. Through rich storytelling, Iris shares her own and other campers' adventures and the lessons from childhood that can shape fulfilling and successful adulthoods. Ultimately, Iris powerfully demonstrates that camp is more than a place or a collection of activities: it's where we learn what it means to be human and what it feels like to truly belong to a family-not of blood, but of history, loyalty, and tradition.

Field Notes from a Pandemic

Field Notes from a Pandemic
Author: Ethan Lou
Publsiher: Signal
Total Pages: 224
Release: 2020-09-29
ISBN 10: 0771029985
ISBN 13: 9780771029981
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Field Notes from a Pandemic Book Review:

Equal parts travelogue and pandemic guide, journalist Ethan Lou examines the societal effects of COVID-19 and takes us on a mesmerizing journey around a world that will never be the same. Visiting Beijing in January to see his dying grandfather, Canadian journalist Ethan Lou unknowingly walks into a state under siege. In his journey out of China and into other hot zones in Asia and Europe, he finds himself witnessing the very earliest stages of a virus that will forever change the world as we know it. Lou argues that Coronavirus will have a far greater impact than SARS, for example, simply because China is now many more times integrated with the increasingly interconnected world. Over decades, globalization has crafted a world painfully sensitive and susceptible to shocks such as this pandemic. A crisis like it has thus been long overdue--and we have yet to see it unfold fully. In our integrated world, events that may previously be isolated now ripple farther and wider and in ways we do not expect and cannot foresee. We have not seen the worst, and if and when we outlast this pandemic, nothing will ever be the same--not just healthcare systems but also economies, politics and culture. Decisions now--or indecisions--will shape and define the world for decades. These ideas are fleshed out through the virus's spawning and how it spread, the unprecedented measures to contain it and an examination of past pandemics and other crises and how they shaped the world--and an argument for why this one's different. Lou shows how drastically the virus has transformed the world and charts the greater and more radical shifts to come. His ideas and arguments are framed around his journey around the world, whose path the virus seemed to follow until he landed safely in quarantine in a small town in Germany where he was able to take stock and start telling his story.

The Psychic Soviet

The Psychic Soviet
Author: Ian F. Svenonius
Publsiher: Akashic Books
Total Pages: 329
Release: 2020-07-07
ISBN 10: 1617757845
ISBN 13: 9781617757846
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

The Psychic Soviet Book Review:

"In a sense the book is Mr. Svenonius's love letter to the good old days of do-it-yourself punk concerts, though it's cleverly disguised as a series of Marxian essays." --New York Times "The pocket-sized book--given Svenonius's communism infatuation, the parallel to Mao's Little Red Book is no mistake--contains well-thought-out arguments on a variety of subjects, from vampires to the origins of punk rock. It's often funny, but never in a self-consciously ironic way." --Washington Post "Ian Svenonius has come a long way since Sassy Magazine first dubbed him the 'Sassiest Boy in America' in 1991. The DC singer has never been anything less than political to the extreme." --Village Voice A new, expanded collection of essays and articles from one of the mainstays of the Washington, DC, underground rock and roll scene, The Psychic Soviet is Ian F. Svenonius's groundbreaking first book of writings. The selections are written in a lettered yet engaging style, filled with parody and biting humor that subvert capitalist culture, and cover such topics as the ascent of the DJ as a star, the "cosmic depression" that followed the defeat of the USSR, how Seinfeld caused the bankruptcy of modern pop culture, and the status of rock and roll as a religion. The pocket-sized book is bound with a durable bright-pink plastic cover, recalling the aesthetics of Mao's Little Red Book, and perfect for carrying into the fray of street battle, classroom, or lunch-counter argument.

The Bone and Sinew of the Land

The Bone and Sinew of the Land
Author: Anna-Lisa Cox
Publsiher: PublicAffairs
Total Pages: 304
Release: 2018-06-12
ISBN 10: 1610398114
ISBN 13: 9781610398114
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

The Bone and Sinew of the Land Book Review:

The long-hidden stories of America's black pioneers, the frontier they settled, and their fight for the heart of the nation When black settlers Keziah and Charles Grier started clearing their frontier land in 1818, they couldn't know that they were part of the nation's earliest struggle for equality; they were just looking to build a better life. But within a few years, the Griers would become early Underground Railroad conductors, joining with fellow pioneers and other allies to confront the growing tyranny of bondage and injustice. The Bone and Sinew of the Land tells the Griers' story and the stories of many others like them: the lost history of the nation's first Great Migration. In building hundreds of settlements on the frontier, these black pioneers were making a stand for equality and freedom. Their new home, the Northwest Territory--the wild region that would become present-day Ohio, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, and Wisconsin--was the first territory to ban slavery and have equal voting rights for all men. Though forgotten today, in their own time the successes of these pioneers made them the targets of racist backlash. Political and even armed battles soon ensued, tearing apart families and communities long before the Civil War. This groundbreaking work of research reveals America's forgotten frontier, where these settlers were inspired by the belief that all men are created equal and a brighter future was possible. Named one of Smithsonian's Best History Books of 2018

The Ambassadors

The Ambassadors
Author: Paul Richter
Publsiher: Simon & Schuster
Total Pages: 352
Release: 2020-10-27
ISBN 10: 1501172433
ISBN 13: 9781501172434
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

The Ambassadors Book Review:

Veteran diplomatic correspondent Paul Richter goes behind the battles and the headlines to show how American ambassadors are the unconventional warriors in the Muslim world—running local government, directing drone strikes, building nations, and risking their lives on the front lines. The tale’s heroes are a small circle of top career diplomats who have been an unheralded but crucial line of national defense in the past two decades of wars in the greater Middle East. In The Ambassadors, Paul Richter shares the astonishing, true-life stories of four expeditionary diplomats who “do the hardest things in the hardest places.” The book describes how Ryan Crocker helped rebuild a shattered Afghan government after the fall of the Taliban and secretly negotiated with the shadowy Iranian mastermind General Qassim Suleimani to wage war in Afghanistan and choose new leaders for post-invasion Iraq. Robert Ford, assigned to be a one-man occupation government for an Iraqi province, struggled to restart a collapsed economy and to deal with spiraling sectarian violence—and was taken hostage by a militia. In Syria at the eruption of the civil war, he is chased by government thugs for defying the country’s ruler. J. Christopher Stevens is smuggled into Libya as US Envoy to the rebels during its bloody civil war, then returns as ambassador only to be killed during a terror attach in Benghazi. War-zone veteran Anne Patterson is sent to Pakistan, considered the world’s most dangerous country, to broker deals that prevent a government collapse and to help guide the secret war on jihadists. “An important and illuminating read” (The Washington Post)—The Ambassadors is a candid examination of the career diplomatic corps, America’s first point of contact with the outside world and is a critical piece of modern-day history.

On Pandemics; Deadly Diseases from Bubonic Plague to Coronavirus

On Pandemics; Deadly Diseases from Bubonic Plague to Coronavirus
Author: David Waltner-Towes
Publsiher: Black Incorporated
Total Pages: 272
Release: 2020-06-29
ISBN 10: 9781760642808
ISBN 13: 1760642800
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

On Pandemics; Deadly Diseases from Bubonic Plague to Coronavirus Book Review:

Written by a leading epidemiologist, this engrossing book answers our questions about animal diseases that jump to humans - called zoonoses - including why they have become more common in recent history, and what we can do about them. Almost all pandemics and epidemics - including SARS, Ebola and now COVID-19 - have been caused by diseases that come to us from animals. In On Pandemics, David Waltner-Toews gathers the latest research to profile dozens of illnesses. Why do zoonotic diseases jump from animals to humans - and why do some hang around for good? How have governments responded to pandemics and epidemics throughout history, for better or worse? How have climate change, industrialised farming, cultural practices, biodiversity loss and globalisation made these diseases not only possible, but the inevitable outcomes of our modern lifestyles? Coronaviruses have made bats their home for centuries. Until SARS came along, we didn't know they were there, nor do we know how many other death-dealing viruses might be living undetected in wildlife. On Pandemics examines the increasing impact of animal-borne diseases on our world, and encourages us to re-examine our role in pandemics - for the health of the planet as well as our own survival.

The Unwanted

The Unwanted
Author: Michael Dobbs
Publsiher: Vintage
Total Pages: 384
Release: 2020-03-10
ISBN 10: 0525434836
ISBN 13: 9780525434832
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

The Unwanted Book Review:

"The powerfully told story of a group of German Jews desperately seeking American visas to escape the Nazis, and an illuminating account of America's struggle with the refugee crisis caused by the rise of Hitler. Official tie-in to the U.S. Holocaust Museum multi-year exhibit"--

The Third Degree

The Third Degree
Author: Scott D. Seligman
Publsiher: U of Nebraska Press
Total Pages: 216
Release: 2018
ISBN 10: 1640120602
ISBN 13: 9781640120600
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

The Third Degree Book Review:

If you've ever seen an episode of Law and Order, you can probably recite your Miranda rights by heart. But you likely don't know that these rights had their roots in the case of a young Chinese man accused of murdering three diplomats in Washington DC in 1919. A frantic search for clues and dogged interrogations by gumshoes erupted in sensational news and editorial coverage and intensified international pressure on the police to crack the case. Part murder mystery, part courtroom drama, and part landmark legal case, The Third Degree is the true story of a young man's abuse by the Washington police and an arduous, seven-year journey through the legal system that drew in Warren G. Harding, William Howard Taft, Oliver Wendell Holmes, John W. Davis, and J. Edgar Hoover. The ordeal culminated in a sweeping Supreme Court ruling penned by Justice Louis Brandeis that set the stage for the Miranda warning many years later. Scott D. Seligman argues that the importance of the case hinges not on the defendant's guilt or innocence but on the imperative that a system that presumes one is innocent until proven guilty provides protections against coerced confessions. Today, when the treatment of suspects between arrest and trial remains controversial, when bias against immigrants and minorities in law enforcement continues to deny them their rights, and when protecting individuals from compulsory self-incrimination is still an uphill battle, this century-old legal spellbinder is a cautionary tale that reminds us how we got where we are today and makes us wonder how far we have yet to go.

The Lean Startup

The Lean Startup
Author: Eric Ries
Publsiher: Currency
Total Pages: 320
Release: 2011
ISBN 10: 0307887898
ISBN 13: 9780307887894
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

The Lean Startup Book Review:

Outlines a revisionist approach to management while arguing against common perceptions about the inevitability of startup failures, explaining the importance of providing genuinely needed products and services as well as organizing a business that can adapt to continuous customer feedback.

Three Rings

Three Rings
Author: Daniel Mendelsohn
Publsiher: University of Virginia Press
Total Pages: 128
Release: 2020-09-08
ISBN 10: 0813944678
ISBN 13: 9780813944678
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Three Rings Book Review:

In this genre-defying book, best-selling memoirist and critic Daniel Mendelsohn explores the mysterious links between the randomness of the lives we lead and the artfulness of the stories we tell. Combining memoir, biography, history, and literary criticism, Three Rings weaves together the stories of three exiled writers who turned to the classics of the past to create masterpieces of their own—works that pondered the nature of narrative itself. Erich Auerbach, the Jewish philologist who fled Hitler’s Germany and wrote his classic study of Western literature, Mimesis, in Istanbul... François Fénelon, the seventeenth-century French archbishop whose ingenious sequel to the Odyssey, The Adventures of Telemachus—a veiled critique of the Sun King and the best-selling book in Europe for one hundred years—resulted in his banishment... and the German novelist W. G. Sebald, self-exiled to England, whose distinctively meandering narratives explore Odyssean themes of displacement, nostalgia, and separation from home. Intertwined with these tales of exile and artistic crisis is an account of Mendelsohn’s struggles to write two of his own books—a family saga of the Holocaust and a memoir about reading the Odyssey with his elderly father—that are haunted by tales of oppression and wandering. As Three Rings moves to its startling conclusion, a climactic revelation about the way in which the lives of its three heroes were linked across borders, languages, and centuries forces the reader to reconsider the relationship between narrative and history, art and life. -- Ayad Akhtar