Climate Change Is Racist

Climate Change Is Racist
Author: Jeremy Williams
Publsiher: Icon Books
Total Pages: 128
Release: 2021-06-10
ISBN 10: 1785787764
ISBN 13: 9781785787768
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Climate Change Is Racist Book Review:

‘Will open the minds of even the most ardent denier of climate change and/or systemic racism. If there’s one book that will help you to be an effective activist for climate justice, it’s this one.’ Dr Shola Mos-Shogbamimu ‘Accessible. Poignant. Challenging.’ Nnimmo Bassey, environmentalist and author of To Cook a Continent: Destructive Extraction and the Climate Crisis in Africa When we talk about racism, we often mean personal prejudice or institutional biases. Climate change doesn’t work that way. It is structurally racist, disproportionately caused by majority White people in majority White countries, with the damage unleashed overwhelmingly on people of colour. The climate crisis reflects and reinforces racial injustices. In this eye-opening book, writer and environmental activist Jeremy Williams takes us on a short, urgent journey across the globe – from Kenya to India, the USA to Australia – to understand how White privilege and climate change overlap. We’ll look at the environmental facts, hear the experiences of the people most affected on our planet and learn from the activists leading the change. It’s time for each of us to find our place in the global struggle for justice.

Slow Violence and the Environmentalism of the Poor

Slow Violence and the Environmentalism of the Poor
Author: Rob Nixon
Publsiher: Harvard University Press
Total Pages: 370
Release: 2011-06-01
ISBN 10: 067424799X
ISBN 13: 9780674247994
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Slow Violence and the Environmentalism of the Poor Book Review:

“Slow violence” from climate change, toxic drift, deforestation, oil spills, and the environmental aftermath of war takes place gradually and often invisibly. Rob Nixon focuses on the inattention we have paid to the lethality of many environmental crises, in contrast with the sensational, spectacle-driven messaging that impels public activism today.

Communities in Action

Communities in Action
Author: National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine,Health and Medicine Division,Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice,Committee on Community-Based Solutions to Promote Health Equity in the United States
Publsiher: National Academies Press
Total Pages: 582
Release: 2017-04-27
ISBN 10: 0309452961
ISBN 13: 9780309452960
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Communities in Action Book Review:

In the United States, some populations suffer from far greater disparities in health than others. Those disparities are caused not only by fundamental differences in health status across segments of the population, but also because of inequities in factors that impact health status, so-called determinants of health. Only part of an individual's health status depends on his or her behavior and choice; community-wide problems like poverty, unemployment, poor education, inadequate housing, poor public transportation, interpersonal violence, and decaying neighborhoods also contribute to health inequities, as well as the historic and ongoing interplay of structures, policies, and norms that shape lives. When these factors are not optimal in a community, it does not mean they are intractable: such inequities can be mitigated by social policies that can shape health in powerful ways. Communities in Action: Pathways to Health Equity seeks to delineate the causes of and the solutions to health inequities in the United States. This report focuses on what communities can do to promote health equity, what actions are needed by the many and varied stakeholders that are part of communities or support them, as well as the root causes and structural barriers that need to be overcome.

Who Killed Berta Caceres

Who Killed Berta Caceres
Author: Nina Lakhani
Publsiher: Verso Books
Total Pages: 336
Release: 2020-06-02
ISBN 10: 1788733061
ISBN 13: 9781788733069
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Who Killed Berta Caceres Book Review:

A deeply affecting–and infuriating–portrait of the life and death of a courageous indigenous leader The first time Honduran indigenous leader Berta Cáceres met the journalist Nina Lakhani, Cáceres said, ‘The army has an assassination list with my name at the top. I want to live, but in this country there is total impunity. When they want to kill me, they will do it.’ In 2015, Cáceres won the Goldman Prize, the world’s most prestigious environmental award, for leading a campaign to stop construction of an internationally funded hydroelectric dam on a river sacred to her Lenca people. Less than a year later she was dead. Lakhani tracked Cáceres remarkable career, in which the defender doggedly pursued her work in the face of years of threats and while friends and colleagues in Honduras were exiled and killed defending basic rights. Lakhani herself endured intimidation and harassment as she investigated the murder. She was the only foreign journalist to attend the 2018 trial of Cáceres’s killers, where state security officials, employees of the dam company and hired hitmen were found guilty of murder. Many questions about who ordered and paid for the killing remain unanswered. Drawing on more than a hundred interviews, confidential legal filings, and corporate documents unearthed after years of reporting in Honduras, Lakhani paints an intimate portrait of an extraordinary woman in a state beholden to corporate powers, organised crime, and the United States.

The Violence of Climate Change

The Violence of Climate Change
Author: Kevin J. O'Brien
Publsiher: Georgetown University Press
Total Pages: 240
Release: 2017-06-01
ISBN 10: 1626164363
ISBN 13: 9781626164369
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

The Violence of Climate Change Book Review:

Climate change is viewed as a primarily scientific, economic, or political issue. While acknowledging the legitimacy of these perspectives, Kevin J. O’Brien argues that we should respond to climate change first and foremost as a case of systematic and structural violence. Global warming is largely caused by the carbon emissions of the affluent, emissions that harm the poor first and worst. Climate change is violence because it divides human beings from one another and from the earth. O’Brien offers a constructive and creative response to this violence through practical examples of activism and nonviolent peacemaking, providing brief biographies of five Christians in the United States—John Woolman, Jane Addams, Dorothy Day, Martin Luther King Jr., and Cesar Chavez. These activists’ idealism, social commitment, and political savvy offer lessons of resistance applicable to the struggle against climate change and for social justice.

Natural Resources and Social Conflict

Natural Resources and Social Conflict
Author: M. Schnurr,L. Swatuk
Publsiher: Springer
Total Pages: 247
Release: 2012-03-02
ISBN 10: 1137002468
ISBN 13: 9781137002464
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Natural Resources and Social Conflict Book Review:

This volume brings together international scholars reflecting on the theory and practice of international security, human security, natural resources and environmental change. It contributes by 'centring the margins' and privileging alternative conceptions and understandings of environmental (in)security.

There s Something in the Water

There s Something in the Water
Author: Ingrid Waldron
Publsiher: Unknown
Total Pages: 173
Release: 2018
ISBN 10: 9781773630571
ISBN 13: 1773630571
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

There s Something in the Water Book Review:

An expose of the environmental injustice practiced by the government of Nova Scotia against it's marginalized communities.

Climate Change and Genocide

Climate Change and Genocide
Author: Jürgen Zimmerer
Publsiher: Routledge
Total Pages: 144
Release: 2017-10-02
ISBN 10: 1317502310
ISBN 13: 9781317502319
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Climate Change and Genocide Book Review:

Climate change caused by human activity is the most fundamental challenge facing mankind in the 21st century, since it will drastically alter the living conditions of millions of people, mainly in the Global South. Environmental violence, including resource crises such as peak fossil fuel, will lie at the heart of future conflicts. However, Genocide Studies have so far neglected this subject, due to the emphasis that traditional genocide scholarship places on ideology and legal prosecution, leading to a narrow understanding of the driving forces of genocide. This books aims at changing this, initiating a dialogue between scholars working in the areas of climate change and genocide. Research into genocide as well as climate change is a highly interdisciplinary endeavour, transcending the boundaries of established disciplines. Contributions to this book address this by approaching the subject from a wide array of methodological, theoretical, disciplinary and regional perspectives. As all the contributions show, climate change is a major threat multiplier for violence or non-violent destruction and any understanding of prevention needs to take this into account. They offer a basis for much needed Critical Prevention Studies, which aims at sustainable prevention. This book was originally published as a special issue of the International Journal of Human Rights.

Choked

Choked
Author: Beth Gardiner
Publsiher: University of Chicago Press
Total Pages: 298
Release: 2019-04-26
ISBN 10: 022649585X
ISBN 13: 9780226495859
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Choked Book Review:

Nothing is as elemental, as essential to human life, as the air we breathe. Yet around the world, in rich countries and poor ones, it is quietly poisoning us. Air pollution prematurely kills seven million people every year, including more than one hundred thousand Americans. It is strongly linked to strokes, heart attacks, many kinds of cancer, dementia, and premature birth, among other ailments. In Choked, Beth Gardiner travels the world to tell the story of this modern-day plague, taking readers from the halls of power in Washington and the diesel-fogged London streets she walks with her daughter to Poland’s coal heartland and India’s gasping capital. In a gripping narrative that’s alive with powerful voices and personalities, she exposes the political decisions and economic forces that have kept so many of us breathing dirty air. This is a moving, up-close look at the human toll, where we meet the scientists who have transformed our understanding of pollution’s effects on the body and the ordinary people fighting for a cleaner future. In the United States, air is far cleaner than it once was. But progress has failed to keep up with the science, which tells us that even today’s lower pollution levels are doing real damage. And as the Trump administration rips up the regulations that have brought us where we are, decades of gains are now at risk. Elsewhere, the problem is far worse, and choking nations like China are scrambling to replicate the achievements of an American agency—the EPA—that until recently was the envy of the world. Clean air feels like a birthright. But it can disappear in a puff of smoke if the rules that protect it are unraveled. At home and around the world, it’s never been more important to understand how progress happened and what dangers might still be in store. Choked shows us that we hold the power to build a cleaner, healthier future: one in which breathing, life’s most basic function, no longer carries a hidden danger.

The New Jim Crow

The New Jim Crow
Author: Michelle Alexander
Publsiher: The New Press
Total Pages: 434
Release: 2020-01-07
ISBN 10: 1620971941
ISBN 13: 9781620971949
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

The New Jim Crow Book Review:

Named one of the most important nonfiction books of the 21st century by Entertainment Weekly‚ Slate‚ Chronicle of Higher Eduction‚ Literary Hub, Book Riot‚ and Zora A tenth-anniversary edition of the iconic bestseller—“one of the most influential books of the past 20 years,” according to the Chronicle of Higher Education—with a new preface by the author “It is in no small part thanks to Alexander’s account that civil rights organizations such as Black Lives Matter have focused so much of their energy on the criminal justice system.” —Adam Shatz, London Review of Books Seldom does a book have the impact of Michelle Alexander’s The New Jim Crow. Since it was first published in 2010, it has been cited in judicial decisions and has been adopted in campus-wide and community-wide reads; it helped inspire the creation of the Marshall Project and the new $100 million Art for Justice Fund; it has been the winner of numerous prizes, including the prestigious NAACP Image Award; and it has spent nearly 250 weeks on the New York Times bestseller list. Most important of all, it has spawned a whole generation of criminal justice reform activists and organizations motivated by Michelle Alexander’s unforgettable argument that “we have not ended racial caste in America; we have merely redesigned it.” As the Birmingham News proclaimed, it is “undoubtedly the most important book published in this century about the U.S.” Now, ten years after it was first published, The New Press is proud to issue a tenth-anniversary edition with a new preface by Michelle Alexander that discusses the impact the book has had and the state of the criminal justice reform movement today.

The Intersection of Environmental Justice Climate Change Community and the Ecology of Life

The Intersection of Environmental Justice  Climate Change  Community  and the Ecology of Life
Author: Ande A. Nesmith,Cathryne L. Schmitz,Yolanda Machado-Escudero,Shanondora Billiot,Rachel A. Forbes,Meredith C. F. Powers,Nikita Buckhoy,Lucy A. Lawrence
Publsiher: Springer Nature
Total Pages: 162
Release: 2020-10-23
ISBN 10: 3030559513
ISBN 13: 9783030559519
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

The Intersection of Environmental Justice Climate Change Community and the Ecology of Life Book Review:

This book examines and encourages the increasing involvement of those in the social sciences, including social work, as well as everyday citizens, with environmental injustices that affect the natural ecology, community health, and physical and mental health of marginalized communities. The authors draw on their diverse experiences in research, practice, and education to suggest interdisciplinary strategies for addressing environmental justice, climate change, and ecological destruction on both a local and global scale. This insightful work presents models for action, practice, and education, including field learning, with examples of how programs and schools have integrated and infused environmental justice content across their curricula. Environmental and ecological impacts on local communities as well as the whole ecology of life are examined. Models for engaging civic dialogue, addressing structural oppression, and employing other interdisciplinary responses to environmental injustices are provided. Topics explored among the chapters include: Water, Air, and Land: The Foundation for Life, Food, and Society Human Health and Well-Being in Times of Global Environmental Crisis Power and Politics: Protection, Rebuilding, and Justice Pathways to Change: Community and Environmental Transformation Decolonizing Nature: The Potential of Nature to Heal The Intersection of Environmental Justice, Climate Change, Community, and the Ecology of Life equips readers to identify the impact of the global environmental crisis in their own communities. Emphasizing the need for immediate action on ecological, climate, and environmental justice issues, this forward-thinking book assists social science professionals, educators, researchers, and other concerned individuals with the knowledge needed for creating meaningful interdisciplinary responses in their communities as they take action within a rapidly changing context.

Energy Islands

Energy Islands
Author: Catalina M de Onís
Publsiher: Univ of California Press
Total Pages: 300
Release: 2021-06-22
ISBN 10: 0520380630
ISBN 13: 9780520380639
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Energy Islands Book Review:

Energy Islands provides an urgent and nuanced portrait of collective action that resists racial capitalism, colonialism, and climate disruption. Weaving together historical and ethnographic research, this story challenges the master narratives of Puerto Rico as a tourist destination and site of "natural" disasters to demonstrate how fossil fuel economies are inextricably entwined with colonial practices and how local community groups in Puerto Rico have struggled against energy coloniality to mobilize and transform power from the ground up. Catalina M. de Onís documents how these groups work to decenter continental contexts and deconstruct damaging hierarchies that devalue and exploit rural coastal communities. She highlights and collaborates with individuals who refuse the cruel logics of empire by imagining and implementing energy justice and other interconnected radical power transformations. Diving deeply into energy, islands, and power, this book engages various metaphors for alternative world-making.

Climate Change and Human Behavior

Climate Change and Human Behavior
Author: Andreas Miles-Novelo,Craig A. Anderson
Publsiher: Cambridge University Press
Total Pages: 75
Release: 2021-12-31
ISBN 10: 9781108948678
ISBN 13: 1108948677
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Climate Change and Human Behavior Book Review:

Much of the current rhetoric surrounding climate change focuses on the physical changes to the environment and the resulting material damage to infrastructure and resources. Although there has been some dialogue about secondary effects (namely mass migration), little effort has been given to understanding how rapid climate change is affecting people on group and individual levels. In this Element, we examine the psychological impacts of climate change, especially focused on how it will lead to increases in aggressive behaviors and violent conflict, and how it will influence other aspects of human behavior. We also look at previously established psychological effects and use them to help explain changes in human behavior resulting from rapid climate change, as well as to propose actions that can be taken to reduce climate change itself and mitigate harmful effects on humans.

Indigenous Resurgence

Indigenous Resurgence
Author: Jaskiran Dhillon
Publsiher: Berghahn Books
Total Pages: 170
Release: 2022-03-31
ISBN 10: 1800732465
ISBN 13: 9781800732469
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Indigenous Resurgence Book Review:

From the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe’s resistance against the Dakota Access pipeline to the Nepalese Newar community’s protest of the Fast Track Road Project, Indigenous peoples around the world are standing up and speaking out against global capitalism to protect the land, water, and air. By reminding us of the fundamental importance of placing Indigenous politics, histories, and ontologies at the center of our social movements, Indigenous Resurgence positions environmental justice within historical, social, political, and economic contexts, exploring the troubling relationship between colonial and environmental violence and reframing climate change and environmental degradation through an anticolonial lens.

A Research Agenda for Geographies of Slow Violence

A Research Agenda for Geographies of Slow Violence
Author: Shannon O’Lear
Publsiher: Edward Elgar Publishing
Total Pages: 256
Release: 2021-06-25
ISBN 10: 178897803X
ISBN 13: 9781788978033
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

A Research Agenda for Geographies of Slow Violence Book Review:

This timely Research Agenda highlights how slow violence, unlike other forms of conflict and direct, physical violence, is difficult to see and measure. It explores ways in which geographers study, analyze and draw attention to forms of harm and violence that have often not been at the forefront of public awareness, including slow violence affecting children, women, Indigenous peoples, and the environment.

Hope in the Age of Climate Change

Hope in the Age of Climate Change
Author: Chris Doran
Publsiher: Wipf and Stock Publishers
Total Pages: 258
Release: 2017-04-27
ISBN 10: 1498297021
ISBN 13: 9781498297028
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Hope in the Age of Climate Change Book Review:

It is difficult to be hopeful in the midst of daily news about the effects of climate change on people and our planet. While the Christian basis for hope is the resurrection of Jesus, unfortunately far too many American Protestant Christians do not connect this belief with the daily witness of their faith. This book argues that the resurrection proclaims a notion of hope that should be the foundation of a theology of creation care that manifests itself explicitly in the daily lives of believers. Christian hope not only inspires us to do great and courageous things but also serves as a critique of current systems and powers that degrade humans, nonhumans, and the rest of creation and thus cause us to be hopeless. Belief in the resurrection hope should cause us to be a different sort of people. Christians should think, purchase, eat, and act in novel and courageous ways because they are motivated daily by the resurrection of Jesus. This is the only way to be hopeful in the age of climate change.

Reconsidering Reparations

Reconsidering Reparations
Author: Olúfhemi O. Táíwò
Publsiher: Oxford University Press
Total Pages: 288
Release: 2022-01-06
ISBN 10: 019750891X
ISBN 13: 9780197508916
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Reconsidering Reparations Book Review:

Reparations for slavery have become a reinvigorated topic for public debate over the last decade. Most theorizing about reparations treats it as a social justice project - either rooted in reconciliatory justice focused on making amends in the present; or, they focus on the past, emphasizing restitution for historical wrongs. Olúfemi O. Táíwò argues that neither approach is optimal, and advances a different case for reparations - one rooted in a hopeful future that tackles the issue of climate change head on, with distributive justice at its core. This view, which he calls the "constructive" view of reparations, argues that reparations should be seen as a future-oriented project engaged in building a better social order; and that the costs of building a more equitable world should be distributed more to those who have inherited the moral liabilities of past injustices. This approach to reparations, as Táíwò shows, has deep and surprising roots in the thought of Black political thinkers such as James Baldwin, Martin Luther King Jr, and Nkechi Taifa, as well as mainstream political philosophers like John Rawls, Charles Mills, and Elizabeth Anderson. Táíwò's project has wide implications for our views of justice, racism, the legacy of colonialism, and climate change policy.

Environmental Justice in the Anthropocene

Environmental Justice in the Anthropocene
Author: Stacia Ryder,Kathryn Powlen,Melinda Laituri,Stephanie A. Malin,Joshua Sbicca,Dimitris Stevis
Publsiher: Routledge
Total Pages: 358
Release: 2021-06-10
ISBN 10: 1000396584
ISBN 13: 9781000396584
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Environmental Justice in the Anthropocene Book Review:

Through various international case studies presented by both practitioners and scholars, Environmental Justice in the Anthropocene explores how an environmental justice approach is necessary for reflections on inequality in the Anthropocene and for forging societal transitions toward a more just and sustainable future. Environmental justice is a central component of sustainability politics during the Anthropocene – the current geological age in which human activity is the dominant influence on climate and the environment. Every aspect of sustainability politics requires a close analysis of equity implications, including problematizing the notion that humans as a collective are equally responsible for ushering in this new epoch. Environmental justice provides us with the tools to critically investigate the drivers and characteristics of this era and the debates over the inequitable outcomes of the Anthropocene for historically marginalized peoples. The contributors to this volume focus on a critical approach to power and issues of environmental injustice across time, space, and context, drawing from twelve national contexts: Austria, Bangladesh, Chile, China, India, Nicaragua, Hungary, Mexico, Brazil, Sweden, Tanzania, and the United States. Beyond highlighting injustices, the volume highlights forward-facing efforts at building just transitions, with a goal of identifying practical steps to connect theory and movement and envision an environmentally and ecologically just future. This interdisciplinary work will be of great interest to students, scholars, and practitioners focused on conservation, environmental politics and governance, environmental and earth sciences, environmental sociology, environment and planning, environmental justice, and global sustainability and governance. It will also be of interest to social and environmental justice advocates and activists.

All We Can Save

All We Can Save
Author: Ayana Elizabeth Johnson,Katharine K. Wilkinson
Publsiher: One World
Total Pages: 448
Release: 2020-09-22
ISBN 10: 0593237064
ISBN 13: 9780593237069
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

All We Can Save Book Review:

NATIONAL BESTSELLER • Provocative and illuminating essays from women at the forefront of the climate movement who are harnessing truth, courage, and solutions to lead humanity forward. “A powerful read that fills one with, dare I say . . . hope?”—The New York Times NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY SMITHSONIAN MAGAZINE There is a renaissance blooming in the climate movement: leadership that is more characteristically feminine and more faithfully feminist, rooted in compassion, connection, creativity, and collaboration. While it’s clear that women and girls are vital voices and agents of change for this planet, they are too often missing from the proverbial table. More than a problem of bias, it’s a dynamic that sets us up for failure. To change everything, we need everyone. All We Can Save illuminates the expertise and insights of dozens of diverse women leading on climate in the United States—scientists, journalists, farmers, lawyers, teachers, activists, innovators, wonks, and designers, across generations, geographies, and race—and aims to advance a more representative, nuanced, and solution-oriented public conversation on the climate crisis. These women offer a spectrum of ideas and insights for how we can rapidly, radically reshape society. Intermixing essays with poetry and art, this book is both a balm and a guide for knowing and holding what has been done to the world, while bolstering our resolve never to give up on one another or our collective future. We must summon truth, courage, and solutions to turn away from the brink and toward life-giving possibility. Curated by two climate leaders, the book is a collection and celebration of visionaries who are leading us on a path toward all we can save. With essays and poems by: Emily Atkin • Xiye Bastida • Ellen Bass • Colette Pichon Battle • Jainey K. Bavishi • Janine Benyus • adrienne maree brown • Régine Clément • Abigail Dillen • Camille T. Dungy • Rhiana Gunn-Wright • Joy Harjo • Katharine Hayhoe • Mary Annaïse Heglar • Jane Hirshfield • Mary Anne Hitt • Ailish Hopper • Tara Houska, Zhaabowekwe • Emily N. Johnston • Joan Naviyuk Kane • Naomi Klein • Kate Knuth • Ada Limón • Louise Maher-Johnson • Kate Marvel • Gina McCarthy • Anne Haven McDonnell • Sarah Miller • Sherri Mitchell, Weh’na Ha’mu Kwasset • Susanne C. Moser • Lynna Odel • Sharon Olds • Mary Oliver • Kate Orff • Jacqui Patterson • Leah Penniman • Catherine Pierce • Marge Piercy • Kendra Pierre-Louis • Varshini • Prakash • Janisse Ray • Christine E. Nieves Rodriguez • Favianna Rodriguez • Cameron Russell • Ash Sanders • Judith D. Schwartz • Patricia Smith • Emily Stengel • Sarah Stillman • Leah Cardamore Stokes • Amanda Sturgeon • Maggie Thomas • Heather McTeer Toney • Alexandria Villaseñor • Alice Walker • Amy Westervelt • Jane Zelikova

Natural Resources and Social Conflict

Natural Resources and Social Conflict
Author: Matthew A. Schnurr,Larry A. Swatuk
Publsiher: Palgrave Macmillan
Total Pages: 247
Release: 2012-03-02
ISBN 10: 0230297838
ISBN 13: 9780230297838
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Natural Resources and Social Conflict Book Review:

Introduction: Towards Critical Environmental Security-- M.Schnurr & L.Swatuk What Are We Really Looking For? From Eco-violence to Environmental Injustice-- P.Stoett Climatic Security and the Tipping Point Conception of the Earth System-- C.Russill Insecurities of Non-Dominance: Re-Theorizing Human Security and Environmental Change in Developed States-- W.Greaves Water and Security in Africa: State-Centric Narratives, Human Insecurities-- L.Swatuk Avoiding the Resource Curse in Ghana: Assessing the Options-- P.Arthur Sexual Violence, Coltan and the Democratic Republic of Congo-- S.Whitman 'The Elephant in the Room?' Peak Oil on the Security Agenda-- S.Mulligan Dirty Security? Tar Sands, Energy Security and Environmental Violence-- P.Le Billon & A.Carter Loud Bangs and Quiet Canadians: An analysis of oil patch sabotage in British Columbia, Canada-- C.Arsenault Bodies on the Line: The In/Security of Everyday Life in Aamjiwnaang-- S.Wiebe Afterward: Ecoviolence, Security, Geopolitics-- S.Dalby.