Indeh

Indeh
Author: Ethan Hawke
Publsiher: Grand Central Publishing
Total Pages: 240
Release: 2016-06-07
ISBN 10: 1455564109
ISBN 13: 9781455564101
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Indeh Book Review:

The year is 1872. The place, the Apache nations, a region torn apart by decades of war. The people, like Goyahkla, lose his family and everything he loves. After having a vision, the young Goyahkla approaches the Apache leader Cochise, and the entire Apache nation, to lead an attack against the Mexican village of Azripe. It is this wild display of courage that transforms the young brave Goyakhla into the Native American hero Geronimo. But the war wages on. As they battle their enemies, lose loved ones, and desperately cling on to their land and culture, they would utter, "Indeh," or "the dead." When it looks like lasting peace has been reached, it seems like the war is over. Or is it? Indeh captures the deeply rich narrative of two nations at war-as told through the eyes of Naiches and Geronimo-who then try to find peace and forgiveness. Indeh not only paints a picture of some of the most magnificent characters in the history of our country, but it also reveals the spiritual and emotional cost of the Apache Wars. Based on exhaustive research, Indeh offers a remarkable glimpse into the raw themes of cultural differences, the horrors of war, the search for peace, and, ultimately, retribution. The Apache left an indelible mark on our perceptions about the American West, and Indeh shows us why.

The Apache Wars

The Apache Wars
Author: Paul Andrew Hutton
Publsiher: Crown Pub
Total Pages: 514
Release: 2016
ISBN 10: 0770435815
ISBN 13: 9780770435813
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

The Apache Wars Book Review:

"Describes the violent history between the frontiersmen and the Native Americans in the Southwestern borderlands by following Mickey Free, a mixed-blood warrior who played a pivotal role in the fighting as he pursued the Apache Kid."--NoveList.

Once They Moved Like The Wind

Once They Moved Like The Wind
Author: David Roberts
Publsiher: Simon and Schuster
Total Pages: 368
Release: 1994-07-19
ISBN 10: 0671885561
ISBN 13: 9780671885564
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Once They Moved Like The Wind Book Review:

Recounts the days of the Indian wars when the U.S. Cavalry repeatedly tried to subdue the great warriors led by Cochise and, later, Geronimo

Lt. Charles Gatewood and His Apache Wars Memoir

Lt. Charles Gatewood and His Apache Wars Memoir
Author: Charles B. Gatewood,Louis Kraft
Publsiher: U of Nebraska Press
Total Pages: 283
Release: 2005
ISBN 10: 0803227728
ISBN 13: 9780803227729
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Lt. Charles Gatewood and His Apache Wars Memoir Book Review:

"Realizing that he had more experience dealing with Native peoples than other lieutenants serving on the frontier, Gatewood decided to record his experiences. Although he died before he completed his project, the work he left behind remains an important firsthand account of his life as a commander of Apache scouts and as a military commandant of the White Mountain Indian Reservation. Louis Kraft presents Gatewood's previously unpublished account, punctuating it with an introduction, additional text that fills in the gaps in Gatewood's narrative, detailed notes, and an epilogue."--BOOK JACKET.

Wars for Empire

Wars for Empire
Author: Janne Lahti
Publsiher: University of Oklahoma Press
Total Pages: 328
Release: 2017-10-05
ISBN 10: 0806159340
ISBN 13: 9780806159348
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Wars for Empire Book Review:

After the end of the U.S.-Mexican War in 1848, the Southwest Borderlands remained hotly contested territory. Over following decades, the United States government exerted control in the Southwest by containing, destroying, segregating, and deporting indigenous peoples—in essence conducting an extended military campaign that culminated with the capture of Geronimo and the forced removal of the Chiricahua Apaches in 1886. In this book, Janne Lahti charts these encounters and the cultural differences that shaped them. Wars for Empire offers a new perspective on the conduct, duration, intensity, and ultimate outcome of one of America's longest wars. Centuries of conflict with Spain and Mexico had honed Apache war-making abilities and encouraged a culture based in part on warrior values, from physical prowess and specialized skills to a shared belief in individual effort. In contrast, U.S. military forces lacked sufficient training and had little public support. The splintered, protracted, and ferocious warfare exposed the limitations of the U.S. military and of federal Indian policies, challenging narratives of American supremacy in the West. Lahti maps the ways in which these weaknesses undermined the U.S. advance. He also stresses how various Apache groups reacted differently to the U.S. invasion. Ultimately, new technologies, the expansion of Euro-American settlements, and decades of war and deception ended armed Apache resistance. By comparing competing martial cultures and examining violence in the Southwest, Wars for Empire provides a new understanding of critical decades of American imperial expansion and a moment in the history of settler colonialism with worldwide significance.

Why We Serve

Why We Serve
Author: NMAI
Publsiher: Smithsonian Books
Total Pages: 240
Release: 2020-06-16
ISBN 10: 1588346978
ISBN 13: 9781588346971
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Why We Serve Book Review:

Rare stories from more than 250 years of Native Americans' service in the military Why We Serve commemorates the 2020 opening of the National Native American Veterans Memorial at the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian, the first landmark in Washington, DC, to recognize the bravery and sacrifice of Native veterans. American Indians' history of military service dates to colonial times, and today, they serve at one of the highest rates of any ethnic group. Why We Serve explores the range of reasons why, from love of their home to an expression of their warrior traditions. The book brings fascinating history to life with historical photographs, sketches, paintings, and maps. Incredible contributions from important voices in the field offer a complex examination of the history of Native American service. Why We Serve celebrates the unsung legacy of Native military service and what it means to their community and country.

Term Paper Resource Guide to American Indian History

Term Paper Resource Guide to American Indian History
Author: Patrick Russell LeBeau
Publsiher: ABC-CLIO
Total Pages: 376
Release: 2009
ISBN 10: 0313352712
ISBN 13: 9780313352713
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Term Paper Resource Guide to American Indian History Book Review:

Presents one hundred term paper topics regarding American Indian history, from their relationships with early explorers to American legal disputes and battles, and modern civil rights activities.

Military Review

Military Review
Author: Anonim
Publsiher: Anonim
Total Pages: 329
Release: 2005
ISBN 10:
ISBN 13: MINN:31951D02728414J
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Military Review Book Review:

Professional Journal of the United States Army

Professional Journal of the United States Army
Author: Anonim
Publsiher: Anonim
Total Pages: 329
Release: 2005
ISBN 10:
ISBN 13: OSU:32435077712263
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Professional Journal of the United States Army Book Review:

Indian Wars

Indian Wars
Author: Bill Yenne
Publsiher: Westholme Pub Llc
Total Pages: 324
Release: 2008
ISBN 10: 9781594160691
ISBN 13: 1594160694
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Indian Wars Book Review:

Traces the history of the U.S. Army's campaign against the Native American population during the nineteenth century, describing major battles and legendary figures on both sides.

Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee

Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee
Author: Dee Brown
Publsiher: Open Road Media
Total Pages: 494
Release: 2012-10-23
ISBN 10: 1453274146
ISBN 13: 9781453274149
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee Book Review:

The “fascinating” #1 New York Times bestseller that awakened the world to the destruction of American Indians in the nineteenth-century West (The Wall Street Journal). First published in 1970, Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee generated shockwaves with its frank and heartbreaking depiction of the systematic annihilation of American Indian tribes across the western frontier. In this nonfiction account, Dee Brown focuses on the betrayals, battles, and massacres suffered by American Indians between 1860 and 1890. He tells of the many tribes and their renowned chiefs—from Geronimo to Red Cloud, Sitting Bull to Crazy Horse—who struggled to combat the destruction of their people and culture. Forcefully written and meticulously researched, Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee inspired a generation to take a second look at how the West was won. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Dee Brown including rare photos from the author’s personal collection.

The Earth Is Weeping

The Earth Is Weeping
Author: Peter Cozzens
Publsiher: Vintage
Total Pages: 576
Release: 2016-10-25
ISBN 10: 0307958051
ISBN 13: 9780307958051
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

The Earth Is Weeping Book Review:

"Sets a new standard for Western Indian Wars history." —Stuart Rosebrook, True West Magazine *Winner of the Gilder Lehrman Prize for Military History and the 2017 Caroline Bancroft History Prize *Finalist for the Western Writers of America’s 2017 Spur Award in Best Western Historical Nonfiction Bringing together a pageant of fascinating characters including Custer, Sherman, Grant, and a host of other military and political figures, as well as great native leaders such as Crazy Horse, Sitting Bull, Geronimo, and Red Cloud, The Earth is Weeping—lauded by Booklist as “a beautifully written work of understanding and compassion”—is the fullest account to date of how the West was won…and lost. With the end of the Civil War, the nation recommenced its expansion onto traditional Indian tribal lands, setting off a wide-ranging conflict that would last more than three decades. In an exploration of the wars and negotiations that destroyed tribal ways of life even as they made possible the emergence of the modern United States, Peter Cozzens gives us both sides in comprehensive and singularly intimate detail. He illuminates the encroachment experienced by the tribes and the tribal conflicts over whether to fight or make peace, and explores the squalid lives of soldiers posted to the frontier and the ethical quandaries faced by generals who often sympathized with their native enemies. *A Times "History Book of the Year" and A Smithsonian "Top History Book of 2016" *Shortlisted for Military History Magazine's Book of the Year Award

Geronimo's Story of His Life

Geronimo's Story of His Life
Author: Geronimo,S. M. Barrett
Publsiher: Open Road Media
Total Pages: 119
Release: 2016-10-11
ISBN 10: 1504041240
ISBN 13: 9781504041249
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Geronimo's Story of His Life Book Review:

A pivotal piece of nineteenth-century Native American history from a tireless warrior seeking justice for his people. Storied leader of the Bedonkohe band of the Chiricahua Apache tribe, Geronimo led resistance against Mexican and American troops seeking to drive the Apache from their land during the 1850s through the 1880s. In 1886, he finally surrendered to the US Army and became a prisoner of war. Although he would never return to his homeland, Geronimo became an iconic figure in Native American society and even had the honor of riding with President Theodore Roosevelt in his 1905 inaugural parade. That same year, he agreed to share his story with Stephen M. Barrett, a superintendent of education from Lawton, Oklahoma. In Geronimo’s own words, this is his fascinating life story. Beginning with an Apache creation myth, he discusses his youth and family, the bloody conflicts between Mexico and the United States, and his two decades of life as a prisoner. Revered by his people and feared by his enemies, Geronimo narrates his memoir with a compassionate and compelling voice that still resonates today.

General George Crook

General George Crook
Author: Gen. George Crook
Publsiher: Pickle Partners Publishing
Total Pages: 360
Release: 2017-04-07
ISBN 10: 1787204421
ISBN 13: 9781787204423
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

General George Crook Book Review:

General George Crook spent his entire military career, with the exception of the Civil War years, on the frontier. Fighting the Indians, he earned the distinction of being the lowest-ranking West Point cadet ever to rise to the rank of major-general. Crook’s autobiography covers the period from his graduation from West Point in 1852 to June 18, 1876, the day after the famous Battle of the Rosebud. Editor Martin F. Schmitt has supplemented Crook’s life story with other material from the general’s diaries and letters and from contemporary newspapers. “When Red Cloud, the Sioux chief, heard of the death of his old antagonist, the Army officer they called Three Stars, he told a missionary, ‘He, at least, never lied to us.’ General Sherman called Crook the greatest Indian fighter and manager the Army ever had. Yet this man who was the most effective campaigner against the Indians had won their respect and trust. To understand why, you ought to read General George Crook: His Autobiography, edited and annotated by Martin F. Schmitt.”—Los Angeles Times “A story straightforward, accurate, and interesting, packed with detail and saturated with a strong western flavor....The importance of this book lies not merely in its considerable contribution to our knowledge of military history and to the intimate and sometimes trenchant remarks made by Crook about his colleagues, but more particularly in the revelation of the character and aims of the general himself.”—Chicago Tribune

War Before Civilization

War Before Civilization
Author: Lawrence H. Keeley
Publsiher: Oxford University Press
Total Pages: 272
Release: 1997-12-18
ISBN 10: 0199880700
ISBN 13: 9780199880706
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

War Before Civilization Book Review:

The myth of the peace-loving "noble savage" is persistent and pernicious. Indeed, for the last fifty years, most popular and scholarly works have agreed that prehistoric warfare was rare, harmless, unimportant, and, like smallpox, a disease of civilized societies alone. Prehistoric warfare, according to this view, was little more than a ritualized game, where casualties were limited and the effects of aggression relatively mild. Lawrence Keeley's groundbreaking War Before Civilization offers a devastating rebuttal to such comfortable myths and debunks the notion that warfare was introduced to primitive societies through contact with civilization (an idea he denounces as "the pacification of the past"). Building on much fascinating archeological and historical research and offering an astute comparison of warfare in civilized and prehistoric societies, from modern European states to the Plains Indians of North America, War Before Civilization convincingly demonstrates that prehistoric warfare was in fact more deadly, more frequent, and more ruthless than modern war. To support this point, Keeley provides a wide-ranging look at warfare and brutality in the prehistoric world. He reveals, for instance, that prehistorical tactics favoring raids and ambushes, as opposed to formal battles, often yielded a high death-rate; that adult males falling into the hands of their enemies were almost universally killed; and that surprise raids seldom spared even women and children. Keeley cites evidence of ancient massacres in many areas of the world, including the discovery in South Dakota of a prehistoric mass grave containing the remains of over 500 scalped and mutilated men, women, and children (a slaughter that took place a century and a half before the arrival of Columbus). In addition, Keeley surveys the prevalence of looting, destruction, and trophy-taking in all kinds of warfare and again finds little moral distinction between ancient warriors and civilized armies. Finally, and perhaps most controversially, he examines the evidence of cannibalism among some preliterate peoples. Keeley is a seasoned writer and his book is packed with vivid, eye-opening details (for instance, that the homicide rate of prehistoric Illinois villagers may have exceeded that of the modern United States by some 70 times). But he also goes beyond grisly facts to address the larger moral and philosophical issues raised by his work. What are the causes of war? Are human beings inherently violent? How can we ensure peace in our own time? Challenging some of our most dearly held beliefs, Keeley's conclusions are bound to stir controversy.

War of a Thousand Deserts

War of a Thousand Deserts
Author: Brian DeLay
Publsiher: Yale University Press
Total Pages: 496
Release: 2008-11-01
ISBN 10: 0300150423
ISBN 13: 9780300150421
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

War of a Thousand Deserts Book Review:

In the early 1830s, after decades of relative peace, northern Mexicans and the Indians whom they called "the barbarians" descended into a terrifying cycle of violence. For the next fifteen years, owing in part to changes unleashed by American expansion, Indian warriors launched devastating attacks across ten Mexican states. Raids and counter-raids claimed thousands of lives, ruined much of northern Mexico's economy, depopulated its countryside, and left man-made "deserts" in place of thriving settlements. Just as important, this vast interethnic war informed and emboldened U.S. arguments in favor of seizing Mexican territory while leaving northern Mexicans too divided, exhausted, and distracted to resist the American invasion and subsequent occupation. Exploring Mexican, American, and Indian sources ranging from diplomatic correspondence and congressional debates to captivity narratives and plains Indians' pictorial calendars, "War of a Thousand Deserts" recovers the surprising and previously unrecognized ways in which economic, cultural, and political developments within native communities affected nineteenth-century nation-states. In the process this ambitious book offers a rich and often harrowing new narrative of the era when the United States seized half of Mexico's national territory.

Gatewood & Geronimo

Gatewood & Geronimo
Author: Louis Kraft
Publsiher: UNM Press
Total Pages: 290
Release: 2000
ISBN 10: 9780826321305
ISBN 13: 0826321305
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Gatewood & Geronimo Book Review:

In the late 1870s Geronimo, a medicine man, emerged as a brilliant Chiricahua leader and fiercely resisted his people's incarceration on inhospitable federal reservations. His fight for freedom, often bloody, in New Mexico, Arizona, and Mexico triggered the deployment of hundreds of United States and Mexican troops and Apache Scouts to hunt him and his people. In the end, the United States Army recalled Gatewood to Apache service, ordering him into the Sierra Madre of northern Mexico to locate Geronimo and negotiate his band's surrender.

In Search of an Elusive Enemy The Victorio Campaign

In Search of an Elusive Enemy The Victorio Campaign
Author: Combat Studies Institute Press,Kendall D Gott
Publsiher: Anonim
Total Pages: 62
Release: 2019-07-18
ISBN 10: 9781081240608
ISBN 13: 1081240601
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

In Search of an Elusive Enemy The Victorio Campaign Book Review:

In Search of an Elusive Enemy: The Victorio Campaign, 1879-1880 represents another in a series of military case studies published by the Combat Studies Institute (CSI) at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. This work examines the US Army's efforts in tracking down Victorio, the infamous Apache chief who raided large tracts of New Mexico and Texas at will, terrorizing the entire region. The key point made in this work is that it demonstrates the challenges of tracking and capturing or killing a small, irregular group of warriors in inhospitable terrain and among an alien culture.Although set in the late 19th century, this case study is still extremely relevant for today's Army. The commanders of the 9th and 10th US Cavalry Regiments faced a skilled adversary who used unconventional tactics and methods as well as an international border to seek sanctuary. However, it could just as easily have featured the stories of Osceola, Aguinaldo, Pancho Villa, or Osama bin Laden. The similarities to challenges that US and coalition forces face in Afghanistan and Iraq are striking. The commanders of the 19th century faced enormous challenges in the rugged terrain of the American Southwest as well as a skeptical and often hostile press. Again, officers and soldiers who have recently served in Afghanistan and Iraq will certainly see parallels here.As the US Army continues its efforts in combating terrorists where they live, the lessons found in this narrative are well worth revisiting.

Native American Code Talkers

Native American Code Talkers
Author: M. Eboch M.
Publsiher: ABDO
Total Pages: 112
Release: 2015-08
ISBN 10: 1629697796
ISBN 13: 9781629697796
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Native American Code Talkers Book Review:

This title examines the Native American servicemen known as the code talkers, focusing on their role in coded communication during World War II including developing the codes, their training, and their work in war zones. Compelling narrative text and well-chosen historical photographs and primary sources make this book perfect for report writing. Features include a glossary, a selected bibliography, websites, source notes, and an index, plus a timeline and essential facts. Aligned to Common Core Standards and correlated to state standards. Essential Library is an imprint of Abdo Publishing, a division of ABDO.

Life of Tom Horn, Government Scout and Interpreter, Written by Himself, Together with His Letters and Statements by His Friends

Life of Tom Horn, Government Scout and Interpreter, Written by Himself, Together with His Letters and Statements by His Friends
Author: Tom Horn
Publsiher: University of Oklahoma Press
Total Pages: 277
Release: 1973-02
ISBN 10: 9780806110448
ISBN 13: 0806110449
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Life of Tom Horn, Government Scout and Interpreter, Written by Himself, Together with His Letters and Statements by His Friends Book Review:

On November 20, 1903, Tom Horn was hanged in Cheyenne, Wyoming, for the murder of a fourteen-year-old nester boy. Horn-army scout and interpreter for Generals Willcox, Crook, and Miles in the Apache wars, Pinkerton operative, cattle detective, and "King of Cowboys"-was hanged like a common criminal, many think mistakenly. His own account of his life, written while he was in prison and first published in 1904, is not really a vindication, says Dean Krakel in his introduction. "While the appendix is spiked with interesting letters, testimonials, and transcripts, they don’t really add up to anything in the way of an explanation of what really happened." Regardless of Horn’s guilt or innocence, his story, beginning when he was a runaway Missouri farm boy, provides a firsthand look at scout Al Sieber in action, at the military both great and small, at the wily Geronimo, the renegade Natchez, and old Chief Nana of the Apaches.