Patient H.M.

Patient H.M.
Author: Luke Dittrich
Publsiher: Random House
Total Pages: 480
Release: 2016-08-09
ISBN 10: 067964380X
ISBN 13: 9780679643807
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL


Patient H.M. Book Review:

“Oliver Sacks meets Stephen King”* in this propulsive, haunting journey into the life of the most studied human research subject of all time, the amnesic known as Patient H.M. For readers of The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks comes a story that has much to teach us about our relentless pursuit of knowledge. Winner of the PEN/E.O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award • Los Angeles Times Book Prize Winner NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The Washington Post • New York Post • NPR • The Economist • New York • Wired • Kirkus Reviews • BookPage In 1953, a twenty-seven-year-old factory worker named Henry Molaison—who suffered from severe epilepsy—received a radical new version of the then-common lobotomy, targeting the most mysterious structures in the brain. The operation failed to eliminate Henry’s seizures, but it did have an unintended effect: Henry was left profoundly amnesic, unable to create long-term memories. Over the next sixty years, Patient H.M., as Henry was known, became the most studied individual in the history of neuroscience, a human guinea pig who would teach us much of what we know about memory today. Patient H.M. is, at times, a deeply personal journey. Dittrich’s grandfather was the brilliant, morally complex surgeon who operated on Molaison—and thousands of other patients. The author’s investigation into the dark roots of modern memory science ultimately forces him to confront unsettling secrets in his own family history, and to reveal the tragedy that fueled his grandfather’s relentless experimentation—experimentation that would revolutionize our understanding of ourselves. Dittrich uses the case of Patient H.M. as a starting point for a kaleidoscopic journey, one that moves from the first recorded brain surgeries in ancient Egypt to the cutting-edge laboratories of MIT. He takes readers inside the old asylums and operating theaters where psychosurgeons, as they called themselves, conducted their human experiments, and behind the scenes of a bitter custody battle over the ownership of the most important brain in the world. Patient H.M. combines the best of biography, memoir, and science journalism to create a haunting, endlessly fascinating story, one that reveals the wondrous and devastating things that can happen when hubris, ambition, and human imperfection collide. Praise for Patient H.M. “An exciting, artful blend of family and medical history.”—The New York Times “In prose both elegant and intimate, and often thrilling, Patient H.M. is an important book about the wages not of sin but of science.”—The Washington Post “Spellbinding . . . The fact that Dittrich looks critically at the actual process of scientific investigation is just one of the things to admire about Patient H.M.”—The New York Times Book Review “Patient H.M. tells one of the most fascinating and disturbing stories in the annals of medicine, weaving in ethics, philosophy, a personal saga, the history of neurosurgery, the mysteries of human memory, and an exploration of human ego.”—Sheri Fink, M.D., Pulitzer Prize winner and author of Five Days at Memorial “This is classic reporting and myth-making at the same time.”—Colum McCann, author of Let the Great World Spin *Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

Patient H.M.

Patient H.M.
Author: Luke Dittrich
Publsiher: Random House
Total Pages: 480
Release: 2016-08-11
ISBN 10: 1448104688
ISBN 13: 9781448104680
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL


Patient H.M. Book Review:

In the summer of 1953, maverick neurosurgeon William Beecher Scoville performed a groundbreaking operation on an epileptic patient named Henry Molaison. But it was a catastrophic failure, leaving Henry unable to create long-term memories. Scoville's grandson, Luke Dittrich, takes us on an astonishing journey through the history of neuroscience, from the first brain surgeries in ancient Egypt to the New England asylum where his grandfather developed a taste for human experimentation. Dittrich's investigation confronts unsettling family secrets and reveals the dark roots of modern neuroscience, raising troubling questions that echo into the present day.

Permanent Present Tense

Permanent Present Tense
Author: Suzanne Corkin
Publsiher: Basic Books
Total Pages: 384
Release: 2013-05-14
ISBN 10: 0465033490
ISBN 13: 9780465033492
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL


Permanent Present Tense Book Review:

In 1953, 27-year-old Henry Gustave Molaison underwent an experimental “psychosurgical” procedure—a targeted lobotomy—in an effort to alleviate his debilitating epilepsy. The outcome was unexpected—when Henry awoke, he could no longer form new memories, and for the rest of his life would be trapped in the moment. But Henry’s tragedy would prove a gift to humanity. As renowned neuroscientist Suzanne Corkin explains in Permanent Present Tense, she and her colleagues brought to light the sharp contrast between Henry’s crippling memory impairment and his preserved intellect. This new insight that the capacity for remembering is housed in a specific brain area revolutionized the science of memory. The case of Henry—known only by his initials H. M. until his death in 2008—stands as one of the most consequential and widely referenced in the spiraling field of neuroscience. Corkin and her collaborators worked closely with Henry for nearly fifty years, and in Permanent Present Tense she tells the incredible story of the life and legacy of this intelligent, quiet, and remarkably good-humored man. Henry never remembered Corkin from one meeting to the next and had only a dim conception of the importance of the work they were doing together, yet he was consistently happy to see her and always willing to participate in her research. His case afforded untold advances in the study of memory, including the discovery that even profound amnesia spares some kinds of learning, and that different memory processes are localized to separate circuits in the human brain. Henry taught us that learning can occur without conscious awareness, that short-term and long-term memory are distinct capacities, and that the effects of aging-related disease are detectable in an already damaged brain. Undergirded by rich details about the functions of the human brain, Permanent Present Tense pulls back the curtain on the man whose misfortune propelled a half-century of exciting research. With great clarity, sensitivity, and grace, Corkin brings readers to the cutting edge of neuroscience in this deeply felt elegy for her patient and friend.

Remembering

Remembering
Author: Donald G. MacKay
Publsiher: Prometheus Books
Total Pages: 400
Release: 2019-01-29
ISBN 10: 1633884082
ISBN 13: 9781633884083
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL


Remembering Book Review:

The psychologist who worked with a famous amnesiac patient for fifty years explains what his studies show about how memory functions and ways to keep the brain sharp. At age twenty-seven, Henry Molaison underwent brain surgery to remedy life-threatening epilepsy. This operation inadvertently destroyed his hippocampus, the engine in the brain for forming new memories. Henry--until recently, known only as Patient H.M.--suffered catastrophic memory failures for the rest of his life and he became the most studied amnesia patient in the history of the world. Dr. Donald MacKay's studies with Henry span fifty years. They reveal the profound importance of memory. Memory decline impacts everything that makes a normal human mind and brain worth having: creative expression; artistic endeavors; awareness; and the ability to plan, to comprehend, to detect and correct errors, to appreciate humor, to imagine hypothetical situations, and to perceive novelty in the world. His research also shows how to keep memories sharp at any age and how to offset the degradation that aging and infrequent use inflict on memory. Remembering summarizes other results of the revolution in scientific understanding of mind and memory that began with Henry. Importantly, it makes good on the promise that research with Henry would help others by focusing on what readers who wish to maintain the everyday functioning of memory, mind, and brain (their own or others') can learn from the still ongoing revolution that he inspired.

Patient H.M.

Patient H.M.
Author: Luke Dittrich
Publsiher: Random House
Total Pages: 480
Release: 2016-08-09
ISBN 10: 067964380X
ISBN 13: 9780679643807
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL


Patient H.M. Book Review:

“Oliver Sacks meets Stephen King”* in this propulsive, haunting journey into the life of the most studied human research subject of all time, the amnesic known as Patient H.M. For readers of The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks comes a story that has much to teach us about our relentless pursuit of knowledge. Winner of the PEN/E.O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award • Los Angeles Times Book Prize Winner NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The Washington Post • New York Post • NPR • The Economist • New York • Wired • Kirkus Reviews • BookPage In 1953, a twenty-seven-year-old factory worker named Henry Molaison—who suffered from severe epilepsy—received a radical new version of the then-common lobotomy, targeting the most mysterious structures in the brain. The operation failed to eliminate Henry’s seizures, but it did have an unintended effect: Henry was left profoundly amnesic, unable to create long-term memories. Over the next sixty years, Patient H.M., as Henry was known, became the most studied individual in the history of neuroscience, a human guinea pig who would teach us much of what we know about memory today. Patient H.M. is, at times, a deeply personal journey. Dittrich’s grandfather was the brilliant, morally complex surgeon who operated on Molaison—and thousands of other patients. The author’s investigation into the dark roots of modern memory science ultimately forces him to confront unsettling secrets in his own family history, and to reveal the tragedy that fueled his grandfather’s relentless experimentation—experimentation that would revolutionize our understanding of ourselves. Dittrich uses the case of Patient H.M. as a starting point for a kaleidoscopic journey, one that moves from the first recorded brain surgeries in ancient Egypt to the cutting-edge laboratories of MIT. He takes readers inside the old asylums and operating theaters where psychosurgeons, as they called themselves, conducted their human experiments, and behind the scenes of a bitter custody battle over the ownership of the most important brain in the world. Patient H.M. combines the best of biography, memoir, and science journalism to create a haunting, endlessly fascinating story, one that reveals the wondrous and devastating things that can happen when hubris, ambition, and human imperfection collide. Praise for Patient H.M. “An exciting, artful blend of family and medical history.”—The New York Times “In prose both elegant and intimate, and often thrilling, Patient H.M. is an important book about the wages not of sin but of science.”—The Washington Post “Spellbinding . . . The fact that Dittrich looks critically at the actual process of scientific investigation is just one of the things to admire about Patient H.M.”—The New York Times Book Review “Patient H.M. tells one of the most fascinating and disturbing stories in the annals of medicine, weaving in ethics, philosophy, a personal saga, the history of neurosurgery, the mysteries of human memory, and an exploration of human ego.”—Sheri Fink, M.D., Pulitzer Prize winner and author of Five Days at Memorial “This is classic reporting and myth-making at the same time.”—Colum McCann, author of Let the Great World Spin *Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

Summary and Analysis of Patient H.M.: A Story of Memory, Madness, and Family Secrets

Summary and Analysis of Patient H.M.: A Story of Memory, Madness, and Family Secrets
Author: Worth Books
Publsiher: Open Road Media
Total Pages: 30
Release: 2017-05-16
ISBN 10: 1504046463
ISBN 13: 9781504046466
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL


Summary and Analysis of Patient H.M.: A Story of Memory, Madness, and Family Secrets Book Review:

So much to read, so little time? This brief overview of Patient H.M. tells you what you need to know—before or after you read Luke Dittrich’s book. Crafted and edited with care, Worth Books set the standard for quality and give you the tools you need to be a well-informed reader. This short summary and analysis of Patient H.M.: A Story of Memory, Madness, and Family Secrets includes: Historical context Chapter-by-chapter overviews Profiles of the main characters Detailed timeline of key events Important quotes Fascinating trivia Glossary of terms Supporting material to enhance your understanding of the original work About Patient H.M. by Luke Dittrich: Patient H.M. tells the extraordinary true story of Henry Molaison, a young man who underwent a lobotomy in 1953 in hopes of curing his epilepsy. Instead, he suffered extensive memory loss and would became the most studied patient in the history of neuroscience. Luke Dittrich, whose grandfather performed the surgery, artfully combines family history, medical science, and investigative journalism to create a suspenseful and unsettling narrative on the search to understand the most elusive of scientific research topics: the human memory. The summary and analysis in this ebook are intended to complement your reading experience and bring you closer to a great work of nonfiction.

The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography

The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography
Author: Larry R. Squire
Publsiher: Elsevier
Total Pages: 433
Release: 1998-10-16
ISBN 10: 0080534058
ISBN 13: 9780080534053
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL


The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography Book Review:

This book is the second volume of autobiographical essays by distinguished senior neuroscientists; it is part of the first collection of neuroscience writing that is primarily autobiographical. As neuroscience is a young discipline, the contributors to this volume are truly pioneers of scientific research on the brain and spinal cord. This collection of fascinating essays should inform and inspire students and working scientists alike. The general reader interested in science may also find the essays absorbing, as they are essentially human stories about commitment and the pursuit of knowledge. The contributors included in this volume are: Lloyd M. Beidler, Arvid Carlsson, Donald R. Griffin, Roger Guillemin, Ray Guillery, Masao Ito. Martin G. Larrabee, Jerome Lettvin, Paul D. MacLean, Brenda Milner, Karl H. Pribram, Eugene Roberts and Gunther Stent. Key Features * Second volume in a collection of neuroscience writing that is primarily autobiographical * Contributors are senior neuroscientists who are pioneers in the field

The Perpetual Now

The Perpetual Now
Author: Michael D. Lemonick
Publsiher: Anchor
Total Pages: 324
Release: 2018-01-16
ISBN 10: 1101872535
ISBN 13: 9781101872536
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL


The Perpetual Now Book Review:

"The story of Lonni Sue Johnson, a talented artist, musician and amateur pilot who lost all capacity for short term memory when she suffered encephalitis and the amazing scientific discoveries her condition has inspired"--

Reaching Down the Rabbit Hole

Reaching Down the Rabbit Hole
Author: Dr. Allan H. Ropper,Brian David Burrell
Publsiher: St. Martin's Press
Total Pages: 272
Release: 2014-09-30
ISBN 10: 125003499X
ISBN 13: 9781250034991
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL


Reaching Down the Rabbit Hole Book Review:

"Tell the doctor where it hurts." It sounds simple enough, unless the problem affects the very organ that produces awareness and generates speech. What is it like to try to heal the body when the mind is under attack? In this book, Dr. Allan Ropper and Brian Burrell take the reader behind the scenes at Harvard Medical School's neurology unit to show how a seasoned diagnostician faces down bizarre, life-altering afflictions. Like Alice in Wonderland, Dr. Ropper inhabits a world where absurdities abound: • A figure skater whose body has become a ticking time-bomb • A salesman who drives around and around a traffic rotary, unable to get off • A college quarterback who can't stop calling the same play • A child molester who, after falling on the ice, is left with a brain that is very much dead inside a body that is very much alive • A mother of two young girls, diagnosed with ALS, who has to decide whether a life locked inside her own head is worth living How does one begin to treat such cases, to counsel people whose lives may be changed forever? How does one train the next generation of clinicians to deal with the moral and medical aspects of brain disease? Dr. Ropper and his colleague answer these questions by taking the reader into a rarified world where lives and minds hang in the balance.

The Man Who Mistook His Wife For A Hat: And Other Clinical Tales

The Man Who Mistook His Wife For A Hat: And Other Clinical Tales
Author: Oliver Sacks
Publsiher: Simon and Schuster
Total Pages: 243
Release: 1998
ISBN 10: 0684853949
ISBN 13: 9780684853949
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL


The Man Who Mistook His Wife For A Hat: And Other Clinical Tales Book Review:

Presents a series of stories about men and women who, representing both medical and literary oddities, raise fundamental questions about the nature of reality

The Telling Room

The Telling Room
Author: Michael Paterniti
Publsiher:
Total Pages: 368
Release: 2013-07-30
ISBN 10: 0385337000
ISBN 13: 9780385337007
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL


The Telling Room Book Review:

The author of the best-selling Driving Mr. Albert recounts his visit to the medieval Castilian village of Guzman as part of a decade-long effort to taste the world's finest cheese, an encounter that involved him in long-held regional secrets and the story of a heartbroken genius cheesemaker.

What Patients Taught Me

What Patients Taught Me
Author: Audrey Young
Publsiher: Sasquatch Books
Total Pages: 240
Release: 2009-09-29
ISBN 10: 1570616582
ISBN 13: 9781570616587
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL


What Patients Taught Me Book Review:

Do sleek high-tech hospitals teach more about medicine and less about humanity? Do doctors ever lose their tolerance for suffering? With sensitive observation and graceful prose, this book explores some of the difficult and deeply personal questions a 23-year-old doctor confronts with her very first dying patient, and continues to struggle with as she strives to become a good doctor. In her travels, the doctor attends to terminal illness, AIDS, tuberculosis, and premature birth in small rural communities throughout the world.

The Auxiliary Nurse

The Auxiliary Nurse
Author: H. M. Erasmus,Liezel Booysen,Van Zyl, M. D. (Magda)
Publsiher: Juta and Company Ltd
Total Pages: 406
Release: 2004-01-01
ISBN 10: 9780702166433
ISBN 13: 070216643X
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL


The Auxiliary Nurse Book Review:

"The Auxiliary Nurse" covers the entire curriculum for learners preparing to write the South African Nursing Council (SANC) examination. Arranged in learning units, the book uses an outcomes based educational strategy to guide both learners and lecturers to essential information. This richly illustrated text has sections on the history of nursing, anatomy and physiology, basic nursing, food and nutrition, first aid and comprehensive health care, which has a strong emphasis on community nursing.

Trouble in Mind

Trouble in Mind
Author: Jenni Ogden PhD
Publsiher: Oxford University Press
Total Pages: 432
Release: 2012-02-01
ISBN 10: 0199921431
ISBN 13: 9780199921430
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL


Trouble in Mind Book Review:

In Trouble in Mind, neuropsychologist Jenni Ogden, author of Fractured Minds, transports the reader into the world of some of her most memorable neurological patients as she explores with compassion, insight, and vivid description the human side of brain damage. These are tales of patients who, as the result of stroke, brain tumor, car crash, or neurological disease, begin thinking and behaving strangely, and with their loved ones' support embark on the long journey to recovery, acceptance of disability and sometimes, death. There is Luke, the gang member who loses his speech but finds he can still sing his favorite blues number "Trouble in Mind," and HM, who teaches the world about memory and becomes the most studied single case in medical history. You will meet Julian, who misplaces his internal map of the human body, and Melody, a singer who risks losing her song when she undergoes brain surgery to cure her epilepsy. Then there is Kim with a severe head injury, and Sophie who has just enough time to put her house in order before Alzheimer's dementia steals her insight. For these and the many other patients whose stories are told in this book, the struggle to understand their disordered minds and disobedient bodies takes extraordinary courage, determination, and patience. For health professionals and researchers working with these patients, the ethical and emotional challenges can be as demanding as the intellectual and treatment decisions they make daily. Trouble In Mind is written in an accessible narrative style that is both accurate and intimate. It will be enjoyed by readers -- whether students, researchers, or professionals in mental health and neuroscience, patients with neurological disorders and their families, or general readers -- who want to learn more about brain disorders and the doctors who care for those who suffer them.

The Disordered Mind

The Disordered Mind
Author: Eric R. Kandel
Publsiher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Total Pages: 304
Release: 2018-08-28
ISBN 10: 0374716102
ISBN 13: 9780374716103
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL


The Disordered Mind Book Review:

A Nobel Prize–winning neuroscientist’s probing investigation of what brain disorders can tell us about human nature Eric R. Kandel, the winner of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his foundational research into memory storage in the brain, is one of the pioneers of modern brain science. His work continues to shape our understanding of how learning and memory work and to break down age-old barriers between the sciences and the arts. In his seminal new book, The Disordered Mind, Kandel draws on a lifetime of pathbreaking research and the work of many other leading neuroscientists to take us on an unusual tour of the brain. He confronts one of the most difficult questions we face: How does our mind, our individual sense of self, emerge from the physical matter of the brain? The brain’s 86 billion neurons communicate with one another through very precise connections. But sometimes those connections are disrupted. The brain processes that give rise to our mind can become disordered, resulting in diseases such as autism, depression, schizophrenia, Parkinson’s, addiction, and post-traumatic stress disorder. While these disruptions bring great suffering, they can also reveal the mysteries of how the brain produces our most fundamental experiences and capabilities—the very nature of what it means to be human. Studies of autism illuminate the neurological foundations of our social instincts; research into depression offers important insights on emotions and the integrity of the self; and paradigm-shifting work on addiction has led to a new understanding of the relationship between pleasure and willpower. By studying disruptions to typical brain functioning and exploring their potential treatments, we will deepen our understanding of thought, feeling, behavior, memory, and creativity. Only then can we grapple with the big question of how billions of neurons generate consciousness itself.

Dignity Therapy

Dignity Therapy
Author: Harvey Max Chochinov
Publsiher: OUP USA
Total Pages: 199
Release: 2012-01-04
ISBN 10: 0195176219
ISBN 13: 9780195176216
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL


Dignity Therapy Book Review:

Maintaining dignity for patients approaching death is a core principle of palliative care. Dignity therapy, a psychological intervention developed by Dr. Harvey Max Chochinov and his internationally lauded research group, has been designed specifically to address many of the psychological, existential, and spiritual challenges that patients and their families face as they grapple with the reality of life drawing to a close. In the first book to lay out the blueprint for this unique and meaningful intervention, Chochinov addresses one of the most important dimensions of being human. Being alive means being vulnerable and mortal; he argues that dignity therapy offers a way to preserve meaning and hope for patients approaching death. With history and foundations of dignity in care, and step by step guidance for readers interested in implementing the program, this volume illuminates how dignity therapy can change end-of-life experience for those about to die - and for those who will grieve their passing.

Creating Modern Neuroscience: The Revolutionary 1950s

Creating Modern Neuroscience: The Revolutionary 1950s
Author: Gordon M. Shepherd
Publsiher: Oxford University Press
Total Pages: 291
Release: 2010
ISBN 10: 0195391500
ISBN 13: 9780195391503
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL


Creating Modern Neuroscience: The Revolutionary 1950s Book Review:

For modern scientists, history often starts with last week's journals and is regarded as largely a quaint interest compared with the advances of today. However, this book makes the case that, measured by major advances, the greatest decade in the history of brain studies was mid-twentieth century, especially the 1950s. The first to focus on worldwide contributions in this period, the book ranges through dozens of astonishing discoveries at all levels of the brain, from DNA (Watson and Crick), through growth factors (Hamburger and Levi-Montalcini), excitability (Hodgkin and Huxley), synapses (Katz and Eccles), dopamine and Parkinson's (Carlsson), visual processing (Hartline and Kuffler), the cortical column (Mountcastle), reticular activating system (Morruzzi and Magoun) and REM sleep (Aserinsky), to stress (Selye), learning (Hebb) and memory (HM and Milner). The clinical fields are also covered, from Cushing and Penfield, psychosurgery and brain energy metabolism (Kety), to most of the major psychoactive drugs in use today (beginning with Delay and Deniker), and much more.The material has been the basis for a highly successful advanced undergraduate and graduate course at Yale, with the classic papers organized and accessible on the web. There is interest for a wide range of readers, academic, and lay because there is a focus on the creative process itself, on understanding how the combination of unique personalities, innovative hypotheses, and new methods led to the advances. Insight is given into this process through describing the struggles between male and female, student and mentor, academic and private sector, and the roles of chance and persistence. The book thus provides a new multidisciplinary understanding of the revolution that created the modern field of neuroscience and set the bar for judging current and future advances.

Memory

Memory
Author: Richard F. Thompson,Stephen A. Madigan
Publsiher: Princeton University Press
Total Pages: 280
Release: 2007-09-02
ISBN 10: 9780691133119
ISBN 13: 0691133115
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL


Memory Book Review:

Originally published: Washington D.C.: Joseph Henry Press, 2005.

To the Bright Edge of the World

To the Bright Edge of the World
Author: Eowyn Ivey
Publsiher: Little, Brown
Total Pages: 432
Release: 2016-08-02
ISBN 10: 0316242845
ISBN 13: 9780316242844
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL


To the Bright Edge of the World Book Review:

An atmospheric, transporting tale of adventure, love, and survival from the bestselling author of The Snow Child, finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. In the winter of 1885, decorated war hero Colonel Allen Forrester leads a small band of men on an expedition that has been deemed impossible: to venture up the Wolverine River and pierce the vast, untamed Alaska Territory. Leaving behind Sophie, his newly pregnant wife, Colonel Forrester records his extraordinary experiences in hopes that his journal will reach her if he doesn't return--once he passes beyond the edge of the known world, there's no telling what awaits him. The Wolverine River Valley is not only breathtaking and forbidding but also terrifying in ways that the colonel and his men never could have imagined. As they map the territory and gather information on the native tribes, whose understanding of the natural world is unlike anything they have ever encountered, Forrester and his men discover the blurred lines between human and wild animal, the living and the dead. And while the men knew they would face starvation and danger, they cannot escape the sense that some greater, mysterious force threatens their lives. Meanwhile, on her own at Vancouver Barracks, Sophie chafes under the social restrictions and yearns to travel alongside her husband. She does not know that the winter will require as much of her as it does her husband, that both her courage and faith will be tested to the breaking point. Can her exploration of nature through the new art of photography help her to rediscover her sense of beauty and wonder? The truths that Allen and Sophie discover over the course of that fateful year change both of their lives--and the lives of those who hear their stories long after they're gone--forever. "An epic adventure story that seems heir to the tradition of Melville's own sweeping and ambitious literary approach to the age-old struggle of humans versus nature . . . An absorbing and high-stakes read." -- Kathleen Rooney, Chicago Tribune An Amazon Best Book of the Year A Washington Post Notable Book A Goodreads Choice Award Nominee A Library Journal Top 10 Book of the Year A BookPage Best Book of the Year

Invention Of Memory

Invention Of Memory
Author: Israel Rosenfield
Publsiher:
Total Pages: 229
Release: 1988-05-15
ISBN 10:
ISBN 13: UOM:39015012416353
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL


Invention Of Memory Book Review:

Discusses the arguments against the localization of memory, looks at machine recognition, and surveys a new theory of memory and perception