Braiding Sweetgrass

Braiding Sweetgrass
Author: Robin Wall Kimmerer
Publsiher: Milkweed Editions
Total Pages: 320
Release: 2013-09-16
ISBN 10: 1571318712
ISBN 13: 9781571318718
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Braiding Sweetgrass Book Review:

As a botanist, Robin Wall Kimmerer has been trained to ask questions of nature with the tools of science. As a member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, she embraces the notion that plants and animals are our oldest teachers. In Braiding Sweetgrass, Kimmerer brings these two lenses of knowledge together to take us on “a journey that is every bit as mythic as it is scientific, as sacred as it is historical, as clever as it is wise” (Elizabeth Gilbert). Drawing on her life as an indigenous scientist, and as a woman, Kimmerer shows how other living beings—asters and goldenrod, strawberries and squash, salamanders, algae, and sweetgrass—offer us gifts and lessons, even if we've forgotten how to hear their voices. In reflections that range from the creation of Turtle Island to the forces that threaten its flourishing today, she circles toward a central argument: that the awakening of ecological consciousness requires the acknowledgment and celebration of our reciprocal relationship with the rest of the living world. For only when we can hear the languages of other beings will we be capable of understanding the generosity of the earth, and learn to give our own gifts in return.

Braiding Sweetgrass

Braiding Sweetgrass
Author: Robin Wall Kimmerer
Publsiher: Penguin UK
Total Pages: 400
Release: 2020-04-23
ISBN 10: 0141991968
ISBN 13: 9780141991962
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Braiding Sweetgrass Book Review:

'A hymn of love to the world ... A journey that is every bit as mythic as it is scientific, as sacred as it is historical, as clever as it is wise' Elizabeth Gilbert, author of Eat, Pray, Love As a botanist, Robin Wall Kimmerer has been trained to ask questions of nature with the tools of science. As a member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, she embraces the notion that plants and animals are our oldest teachers. In Braiding Sweetgrass, Kimmerer brings these two ways of knowledge together. Drawing on her life as an indigenous scientist, a mother, and a woman, Kimmerer shows how other living beings - asters and goldenrod, strawberries and squash, salamanders, algae, and sweetgrass - offer us gifts and lessons, even if we've forgotten how to hear their voices. In a rich braid of reflections that range from the creation of Turtle Island to the forces that threaten its flourishing today, she circles toward a central argument: that the awakening of a wider ecological consciousness requires the acknowledgment and celebration of our reciprocal relationship with the rest of the living world. For only when we can hear the languages of other beings will we be capable of understanding the generosity of the earth, and learn to give our own gifts in return.

Braiding Sweetgrass

Braiding Sweetgrass
Author: Robin Wall Kimmerer
Publsiher: Unknown
Total Pages: 456
Release: 2020-10-13
ISBN 10: 9781571311771
ISBN 13: 1571311777
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Braiding Sweetgrass Book Review:

"I give daily thanks for Robin Wall Kimmerer for being a font of endless knowledge, both mental and spiritual." --RICHARD POWERS, NEW YORK TIMES

Gathering Moss

Gathering Moss
Author: ROBIN WALL. KIMMERER
Publsiher: Unknown
Total Pages: 256
Release: 2021-08-26
ISBN 10: 9780141997629
ISBN 13: 0141997621
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Gathering Moss Book Review:

Study Guide

Study Guide
Author: Supersummary
Publsiher: Unknown
Total Pages: 66
Release: 2019-12-08
ISBN 10: 9781672975216
ISBN 13: 1672975212
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Study Guide Book Review:

SuperSummary, a modern alternative to SparkNotes and CliffsNotes, offers high-quality study guides for challenging works of literature. This 65-page guide for "Braiding Sweetgrass" by Robin Wall Kimmerer includes detailed chapter summaries and analysis covering 32 chapters, as well as several more in-depth sections of expert-written literary analysis. Featured content includes commentary on major characters, 25 important quotes, essay topics, and key themes like The History of Indigenous People and The Intersection of Science and Spirituality.

One Drum

One Drum
Author: Richard Wagamese
Publsiher: Douglas & McIntyre
Total Pages: 329
Release: 2019-10-19
ISBN 10: 177162230X
ISBN 13: 9781771622301
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

One Drum Book Review:

“The most profound truth in the universe is this: that we are all one drum and we need each other.” —Richard Wagamese, One Drum Fans of Richard Wagamese’s writing will be heartened by the news that the bestselling author left behind a manuscript he’d been working on until shortly before his death in 2017. One Drum welcomes readers to unite in ceremony to heal themselves and bring harmony to their lives and communities. In One Drum, Wagamese wrote, “I am not a shaman. Nor am I an elder, a pipe carrier, or a celebrated traditionalist. I am merely one who has trudged the same path many of this human family has—the path of the seeker, called forward by a yearning I have not always understood.” One Drum draws from the foundational teachings of Ojibway tradition, the Grandfather Teachings. Focusing specifically on the lessons of humility, respect and courage, the volume contains simple ceremonies that anyone anywhere can do, alone or in a group, to foster harmony and connection. Wagamese believed that there is a shaman in each of us, and we are all teachers and in the world of the spirit there is no right way or wrong way. Writing of neglect, abuse and loss of identity, Wagamese recalled living on the street, going to jail, drinking too much, feeling rootless and afraid, and then the feeling of hope he gained from connecting with the spiritual ways of his people. He expressed the belief that ceremony has the power to unify and to heal for people of all backgrounds. “When that happens,” he wrote, “we truly become one song and one drum beating together in a common purpose—and we are on the path to being healed.”

Losing Eden

Losing Eden
Author: Lucy Jones
Publsiher: Penguin UK
Total Pages: 272
Release: 2020-02-27
ISBN 10: 0241441544
ISBN 13: 9780241441541
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Losing Eden Book Review:

'Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched ... a convincing plea for a wilder, richer world' Isabella Tree, author of Wilding 'By the time I'd read the first chapter, I'd resolved to take my son into the woods every afternoon over winter. By the time I'd read the sixth, I was wanting to break prisoners out of cells and onto the mossy moors. Losing Eden rigorously and convincingly tells of the value of the natural universe to our human hearts' Amy Liptrot, author of The Outrun Today many of us live indoor lives, disconnected from the natural world as never before. And yet nature remains deeply ingrained in our language, culture and consciousness. For centuries, we have acted on an intuitive sense that we need communion with the wild to feel well. Now, in the moment of our great migration away from the rest of nature, more and more scientific evidence is emerging to confirm its place at the heart of our psychological wellbeing. So what happens, asks acclaimed journalist Lucy Jones, as we lose our bond with the natural world-might we also be losing part of ourselves? Delicately observed and rigorously researched, Losing Eden is an enthralling journey through this new research, exploring how and why connecting with the living world can so drastically affect our health. Travelling from forest schools in East London to the Svalbard Global Seed Vault via primeval woodlands, Californian laboratories and ecotherapists' couches, Jones takes us to the cutting edge of human biology, neuroscience and psychology, and discovers new ways of understanding our increasingly dysfunctional relationship with the earth. Urgent and uplifting, Losing Eden is a rallying cry for a wilder way of life - for finding asylum in the soil and joy in the trees - which might just help us to save the living planet, as well as ourselves.

Take Back the Tray

Take Back the Tray
Author: Joshna Maharaj
Publsiher: ECW Press
Total Pages: 248
Release: 2020-05-05
ISBN 10: 1773054856
ISBN 13: 9781773054858
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Take Back the Tray Book Review:

A beloved chef takes on institutional food and sparks a revolution Good food generally doesn’t arrive on a tray: hospital food is famously ridiculed, chronic student hunger is deemed a rite of passage, and prison meals are considered part of the punishment. But Chef Joshna Maharaj knows that institutional kitchens have the ability to produce good, nourishing food, because she’s been making it happen over the past 14 years. She’s served meals to people who’d otherwise go hungry, baked fresh scones for maternity ward mothers, and dished out wholesome, scratch-made soups to stressed-out undergrads. She’s determined to bring health, humanity, and hospitality back to institutional food while also building sustainability, supporting the local economy, and reinvigorating the work of frontline staff. Take Back the Tray is part manifesto, part memoir from the trenches, and a blueprint for reclaiming control from corporations and brutal bottom lines. Maharaj reconnects food with health, wellness, education, and rehabilitation in a way that serves people, not just budgets, and proves change is possible with honest, sustained commitment on all levels, from government right down to the person sorting the trash. The need is clear, the time is now, and this revolution is delicious.

World of Wonders

World of Wonders
Author: Aimee Nezhukumatathil
Publsiher: Milkweed Editions
Total Pages: 329
Release: 2020-09-08
ISBN 10: 157131959X
ISBN 13: 9781571319593
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

World of Wonders Book Review:

From beloved, award-winning poet Aimee Nezhukumatathil comes a debut work of nonfiction—a collection of essays about the natural world, and the way its inhabitants can teach, support, and inspire us. As a child, Nezhukumatathil called many places home: the grounds of a Kansas mental institution, where her Filipina mother was a doctor; the open skies and tall mountains of Arizona, where she hiked with her Indian father; and the chillier climes of western New York and Ohio. But no matter where she was transplanted—no matter how awkward the fit or forbidding the landscape—she was able to turn to our world’s fierce and funny creatures for guidance. “What the peacock can do,” she tells us, “is remind you of a home you will run away from and run back to all your life.” The axolotl teaches us to smile, even in the face of unkindness; the touch-me-not plant shows us how to shake off unwanted advances; the narwhal demonstrates how to survive in hostile environments. Even in the strange and the unlovely, Nezhukumatathil finds beauty and kinship. For it is this way with wonder: it requires that we are curious enough to look past the distractions in order to fully appreciate the world’s gifts. Warm, lyrical, and gorgeously illustrated by Fumi Nakamura, World of Wonders is a book of sustenance and joy.

Plants Have So Much to Give Us All We Have to Do Is Ask

Plants Have So Much to Give Us  All We Have to Do Is Ask
Author: Mary Siisip Geniusz
Publsiher: U of Minnesota Press
Total Pages: 344
Release: 2015-06-22
ISBN 10: 1452944717
ISBN 13: 9781452944715
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Plants Have So Much to Give Us All We Have to Do Is Ask Book Review:

Mary Siisip Geniusz has spent more than thirty years working with, living with, and using the Anishinaabe teachings, recipes, and botanical information she shares in Plants Have So Much to Give Us, All We Have to Do Is Ask. Geniusz gained much of the knowledge she writes about from her years as an oshkaabewis, a traditionally trained apprentice, and as friend to the late Keewaydinoquay, an Anishinaabe medicine woman from the Leelanau Peninsula in Michigan and a scholar, teacher, and practitioner in the field of native ethnobotany. Keewaydinoquay published little in her lifetime, yet Geniusz has carried on her legacy by making this body of knowledge accessible to a broader audience. Geniusz teaches the ways she was taught—through stories. Sharing the traditional stories she learned at Keewaydinoquay’s side as well as stories from other American Indian traditions and her own experiences, Geniusz brings the plants to life with narratives that explain their uses, meaning, and history. Stories such as “Naanabozho and the Squeaky-Voice Plant” place the plants in cultural context and illustrate the belief in plants as cognizant beings. Covering a wide range of plants, from conifers to cattails to medicinal uses of yarrow, mullein, and dandelion, she explains how we can work with those beings to create food, simple medicines, and practical botanical tools. Plants Have So Much to Give Us, All We Have to Do Is Ask makes this botanical information useful to native and nonnative healers and educators and places it in the context of the Anishinaabe culture that developed the knowledge and practice.

An Indigenous Peoples History of the United States for Young People

An Indigenous Peoples  History of the United States for Young People
Author: Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz
Publsiher: Beacon Press
Total Pages: 280
Release: 2019-07-23
ISBN 10: 0807049409
ISBN 13: 9780807049402
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

An Indigenous Peoples History of the United States for Young People Book Review:

2020 American Indian Youth Literature Young Adult Honor Book 2020 Notable Social Studies Trade Books for Young People,selected by National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) and the Children’s Book Council 2019 Best-Of Lists: Best YA Nonfiction of 2019 (Kirkus Reviews) · Best Nonfiction of 2019 (School Library Journal) · Best Books for Teens (New York Public Library) · Best Informational Books for Older Readers (Chicago Public Library) Spanning more than 400 years, this classic bottom-up history examines the legacy of Indigenous peoples’ resistance, resilience, and steadfast fight against imperialism. Going beyond the story of America as a country “discovered” by a few brave men in the “New World,” Indigenous human rights advocate Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz reveals the roles that settler colonialism and policies of American Indian genocide played in forming our national identity. The original academic text is fully adapted by renowned curriculum experts Debbie Reese and Jean Mendoza, for middle-grade and young adult readers to include discussion topics, archival images, original maps, recommendations for further reading, and other materials to encourage students, teachers, and general readers to think critically about their own place in history.

I Am Ariel Sharon

I Am Ariel Sharon
Author: Yara El-Ghadban
Publsiher: House of Anansi
Total Pages: 104
Release: 2020-11-17
ISBN 10: 1487007981
ISBN 13: 9781487007980
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

I Am Ariel Sharon Book Review:

A bold and innovative novel, I Am Ariel Sharon dives into the tortured mind of the controversial Israeli prime minister as he lies comatose and faces an ultimate reckoning. Award-winning Palestinian Canadian novelist Yara El-Ghadban imagines the confrontation at death’s door between Ariel Sharon, the “King of Israel,” and the women closest to him — his mother, his wives, and the mysterious nurse Rita. Like latter-day Greek furies, they lament the brutality of his life and maltreatment of the Palestinian people and demand he face up to his part in the bloodshed of Israel’s wars. Here is an extraordinary, magical, and impassioned story of nearly impossible empathy, the singular work of a novelist in full flight.

Writing Wild

Writing Wild
Author: Kathryn Aalto
Publsiher: Timber Press
Total Pages: 288
Release: 2020-06-23
ISBN 10: 164326026X
ISBN 13: 9781643260266
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Writing Wild Book Review:

"Re-centers and gives voice to a diversity of women naturalists and writers across time." —Cultivating Place In Writing Wild, Kathryn Aalto celebrates 25 women whose influential writing helps deepen our connection to and understanding of the natural world. These inspiring wordsmiths are scholars, spiritual seekers, conservationists, scientists, novelists, and explorers. They defy easy categorization, yet they all share a bold authenticity that makes their work both distinct and universal. Part travel essay, literary biography, and cultural history, Writing Wild ventures into the landscapes and lives of extraordinary writers and encourages a new generation of women to pick up their pens, head outdoors, and start writing wild. Featured writers include Dorothy Wordsworth, Susan Fenimore Cooper, Gene Stratton-Porter, Mary Austin, and Vita Sackville-West. Nan Shepherd, Rachel Carson, Mary Oliver, Carolyn Merchant, and Annie Dillard. Gretel Ehrlich, Leslie Marmon Silko, Diane Ackerman, Robin Wall Kimmerer, and Lauret Savoy. Rebecca Solnit, Kathleen Jamie, Carolyn Finney, Helen Macdonald, and Saci Lloyd. Andrea Wulf, Camille T. Dungy, Elena Passarello, Amy Liptrot, and Elizabeth Rush.

Late Migrations

Late Migrations
Author: Margaret Renkl
Publsiher: Milkweed Editions
Total Pages: 248
Release: 2019-07-09
ISBN 10: 1571319875
ISBN 13: 9781571319876
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Late Migrations Book Review:

From New York Times opinion writer Margaret Renkl comes an unusual, captivating portrait of a family—and of the cycles of joy and grief that inscribe human lives within the natural world. Growing up in Alabama, Renkl was a devoted reader, an explorer of riverbeds and red-dirt roads, and a fiercely loved daughter. Here, in brief essays, she traces a tender and honest portrait of her complicated parents—her exuberant, creative mother; her steady, supportive father—and of the bittersweet moments that accompany a child’s transition to caregiver. And here, braided into the overall narrative, Renkl offers observations on the world surrounding her suburban Nashville home. Ringing with rapture and heartache, these essays convey the dignity of bluebirds and rat snakes, monarch butterflies and native bees. As these two threads haunt and harmonize with each other, Renkl suggests that there is astonishment to be found in common things: in what seems ordinary, in what we all share. For in both worlds—the natural one and our own—“the shadow side of love is always loss, and grief is only love’s own twin.” Gorgeously illustrated by the author’s brother, Billy Renkl, Late Migrations is an assured and memorable debut.

The World is Blue

The World is Blue
Author: Sylvia A. Earle
Publsiher: National Geographic Books
Total Pages: 303
Release: 2009
ISBN 10: 1426205414
ISBN 13: 9781426205415
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

The World is Blue Book Review:

Traces the oceanic changes that have taken place in the last half-century and why they are posing a global catastrophe, in a cautionary photographic report that conveys the author's impassioned call for responsible and renewable strategies to safeguard the planet's natural systems.

Blood on the Border

Blood on the Border
Author: Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz
Publsiher: University of Oklahoma Press
Total Pages: 312
Release: 2016-08-03
ISBN 10: 0806156430
ISBN 13: 9780806156439
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Blood on the Border Book Review:

Human rights activist and historian Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz has been described as “a force of nature on the page and off.” That force is fully present in Blood on the Border, the third in her acclaimed series of memoirs. Seamlessly blending the personal and the political, Blood on the Border is Dunbar-Ortiz’s firsthand account of the decade-long dirty war pursued by the Contras and the United States against the people of Nicaragua. With the 1981 bombing of a Nicaraguan plane in Mexico City—a plane Dunbar-Ortiz herself would have been on if not for a delay—the US-backed Contras (short for los contrarrevolucionarios) launched a major offensive against Nicaragua’s Sandinista regime, which the Reagan administration labeled as communist. While her rich political analysis of the US-Nicaraguan relationship bears the mark of a trained historian, Dunbar-Ortiz also writes from her perspective as an intrepid activist who spent months at a time throughout the 1980s in the war-torn country, especially in the remote northeastern region, where the Indigenous Miskitu people were relentlessly assailed and nearly wiped out by CIA-trained Contra mercenaries. She makes painfully clear the connections between what many US Americans today remember only vaguely as the Iran-Contra “affair” and ongoing US aggression in the Americas, the Middle East, and around the world—connections made even more explicit in a new afterword written for this edition. A compelling, important, and sobering story on its own, Blood on the Border offers a deeply informed, closely observed, and heartfelt view of history in the making.

Black Skies

Black Skies
Author: Arnaldur Indridason
Publsiher: Random House
Total Pages: 464
Release: 2012-06-21
ISBN 10: 1446485021
ISBN 13: 9781446485026
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Black Skies Book Review:

Detective Sigurdur Oli is in trouble. After a school reunion exposes the chasm between his life and those of his much more successful contemporaries, leaving him bitter and resentful, one of his old friends asks him to pay an unofficial visit to a couple of blackmailers. He readily agrees, only to arrive to find one of the pair lying in a pool of blood. When the victim dies in hospital, Sigurdur Oli is faced with investigating a murder without revealing his own reasons for being present at the murder scene. Moving from the villas of Reykjavík's banking elite to a sordid basement flat, Black Skies is a superb story of greed, pride and murder from one of Europe's most successful crime writers.

Marjory Stoneman Douglas

Marjory Stoneman Douglas
Author: Marjory Stoneman Douglas
Publsiher: Rowman & Littlefield
Total Pages: 268
Release: 2014-10-01
ISBN 10: 1561647799
ISBN 13: 9781561647798
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Marjory Stoneman Douglas Book Review:

Born in Minnesota in 1890 and raised and educated in Massachusetts, Marjory Stoneman Douglas came to Florida in 1915 to work for her father, who had just started a newspaper called the Herald in a small town called Miami. In this "frontier" town, she recovered from a misjudged marriage, learned to write journalism and fiction and drama, took on the fight for feminism and racial justice and conservation long before those causes became popular, and embarked on a long and uncommonly successful voyage into self-understanding. Way before women did this sort of thing, she recognized her own need for solitude and independence, and built her own little house away from town in an area called Coconut Grove. She still lives there, as she has for over 40 years, with her books and cats and causes, emerging frequently to speak, still a powerful force in ecopolitics. Marjory Stoneman Douglas begins this story of her life by admitting that "the hardest thing is to tell the truth about oneself" and ends it stating her belief that "life should be lived so vividly and so intensely that thoughts of another life, or a longer life, are not necessary." The voice that emerges in between is a voice from the past and a voice from the future, a voice of conviction and common sense with a sense of humor, a voice so many audiences have heard over the years—tough words in a genteel accent emerging from a tiny woman in a floppy hat—which has truly become the voice of the river.

Minidewak

Minidewak
Author: Robin Wall Kimmerer,Minnesota Center for Book Arts
Publsiher: Unknown
Total Pages: 72
Release: 2013
ISBN 10: 9781879832695
ISBN 13: 1879832690
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Minidewak Book Review:

Rekindling the Sacred Fire

Rekindling the Sacred Fire
Author: Chantal Fiola
Publsiher: Univ. of Manitoba Press
Total Pages: 264
Release: 2015-04-17
ISBN 10: 0887554806
ISBN 13: 9780887554803
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Rekindling the Sacred Fire Book Review:

Why don’t more Métis people go to traditional ceremonies? How does going to ceremonies impact Métis identity? In Rekindling the Sacred Fire, Chantal Fiola investigates the relationship between Red River Métis ancestry, Anishinaabe spirituality, and identity, bringing into focus the ongoing historical impacts of colonization upon Métis relationships with spirituality on the Canadian prairies. Using a methodology rooted in an Indigenous world view, Fiola interviews eighteen people with Métis ancestry, or an historic familial connection to the Red River Métis, who participate in Anishinaabe ceremonies, sharing stories about family history, self-identification, and their relationships with Aboriginal and Eurocanadian cultures and spiritualities.