An Abbreviated Life

An Abbreviated Life
Author: Ariel Leve
Publsiher: Harper Perennial
Total Pages: 288
Release: 2017-06-13
ISBN 10: 9780062269461
ISBN 13: 0062269461
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

An Abbreviated Life Book Review:

A beautiful, startling, and candid memoir about growing up without boundaries, in which Ariel Leve recalls with candor and sensitivity the turbulent time she endured as the only child of an unstable poet for a mother and a beloved but largely absent father, and explores the consequences of a psychologically harrowing childhood as she seeks refuge from the past and recovers what was lost. Ariel Leve grew up in Manhattan with an eccentric mother she describes as “a poet, an artist, a self-appointed troublemaker and attention seeker.” Leve learned to become her own parent, taking care of herself and her mother’s needs. There would be uncontrolled, impulsive rages followed with denial, disavowed responsibility, and then extreme outpourings of affection. How does a child learn to feel safe in this topsy-turvy world of conditional love? Leve captures the chaos and lasting impact of a child’s life under siege and explores how the coping mechanisms she developed to survive later incapacitated her as an adult. There were material comforts, but no emotional safety, except for summer visits to her father’s home in South East Asia—an escape that was terminated after he attempted to gain custody. Following the death of a loving caretaker, a succession of replacements raised Leve—relationships which resulted in intense attachment and loss. It was not until decades later, when Leve moved to other side of the world, that she could begin to emancipate herself from the past. In a relationship with a man who has children, caring for them yields clarity of what was missing. In telling her haunting story, Leve seeks to understand the effects of chronic psychological maltreatment on a child’s developing brain, and to discover how to build a life for herself that she never dreamed possible: An unabbreviated life.

An Abbreviated Life

An Abbreviated Life
Author: Ariel Leve
Publsiher: HarperCollins
Total Pages: 288
Release: 2016-06-14
ISBN 10: 006226947X
ISBN 13: 9780062269478
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

An Abbreviated Life Book Review:

“Sometimes, a child is born to a parent who can’t be a parent, and, like a seedling in the shade, has to grow toward a distant sun. Ariel Leve’s spare and powerful memoir will remind us that family isn’t everything—kindness and nurturing are.” —Gloria Steinem Ariel Leve grew up in Manhattan with an eccentric mother she describes as “a poet, an artist, a selfappointed troublemaker and attention seeker.” Leve learned to become her own parent, taking care of herself and her mother’s needs. There would be uncontrolled, impulsive rages followed with denial, disavowed responsibility, and then extreme outpourings of affection. How does a child learn to feel safe in this topsyturvy world of conditional love? Leve captures the chaos and lasting impact of a child’s life under siege and explores how the coping mechanisms she developed to survive later incapacitated her as an adult. There were material comforts, but no emotional safety, except for summer visits to her father’s home in South East Asia-an escape that was terminated after he attempted to gain custody. Following the death of a loving caretaker, a succession of replacements raised Leve-relationships which resulted in intense attachment and loss. It was not until decades later, when Leve moved to other side of the world, that she could begin to emancipate herself from the past. In a relationship with a man who has children, caring for them yields a clarity of what was missing. In telling her haunting story, Leve seeks to understand the effects of chronic psychological maltreatment on a child’s developing brain, and to discover how to build a life for herself that she never dreamed possible: An unabbreviated life.

An Abbreviated Life

An Abbreviated Life
Author: Ariel Leve
Publsiher: Harper
Total Pages: 288
Release: 2016-06-14
ISBN 10: 9780062269454
ISBN 13: 0062269453
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

An Abbreviated Life Book Review:

A beautiful, startling, and candid memoir about growing up without boundaries, in which Ariel Leve recalls with candor and sensitivity the turbulent time she endured as the only child of an unstable poet for a mother and a beloved but largely absent father, and explores the consequences of a psychologically harrowing childhood as she seeks refuge from the past and recovers what was lost. Ariel Leve grew up in Manhattan with an eccentric mother she describes as “a poet, an artist, a self-appointed troublemaker and attention seeker.” Leve learned to become her own parent, taking care of herself and her mother’s needs. There would be uncontrolled, impulsive rages followed with denial, disavowed responsibility, and then extreme outpourings of affection. How does a child learn to feel safe in this topsy-turvy world of conditional love? Leve captures the chaos and lasting impact of a child’s life under siege and explores how the coping mechanisms she developed to survive later incapacitated her as an adult. There were material comforts, but no emotional safety, except for summer visits to her father’s home in South East Asia—an escape that was terminated after he attempted to gain custody. Following the death of a loving caretaker, a succession of replacements raised Leve—relationships which resulted in intense attachment and loss. It was not until decades later, when Leve moved to other side of the world, that she could begin to emancipate herself from the past. In a relationship with a man who has children, caring for them yields clarity of what was missing. In telling her haunting story, Leve seeks to understand the effects of chronic psychological maltreatment on a child’s developing brain, and to discover how to build a life for herself that she never dreamed possible: An unabbreviated life.

Charles I Penguin Monarchs

Charles I  Penguin Monarchs
Author: Mark Kishlansky
Publsiher: Penguin UK
Total Pages: 144
Release: 2014-12-04
ISBN 10: 0141979844
ISBN 13: 9780141979847
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Charles I Penguin Monarchs Book Review:

The tragedy of Charles I dominates one of the most strange and painful periods in British history as the whole island tore itself apart over a deadly, entangled series of religious and political disputes. In Mark Kishlansky's brilliant account it is never in doubt that Charles created his own catastrophe, but he was nonetheless opposed by men with far fewer scruples and less consistency who for often quite contradictory reasons conspired to destroy him. This is a remarkable portrait of one of the most talented, thoughtful, loyal, moral, artistically alert and yet, somehow, disastrous of all this country's rulers.

The Rules Do Not Apply

The Rules Do Not Apply
Author: Ariel Levy
Publsiher: Unknown
Total Pages: 207
Release: 2017
ISBN 10: 0812996933
ISBN 13: 9780812996937
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

The Rules Do Not Apply Book Review:

When Ariel Levy left for a reporting trip to Mongolia in 2012, she was pregnant, married, financially secure, and successful on her own terms. A month later, none of that was true.

A Complex Sorrow

A Complex Sorrow
Author: Marianne A. Paget,Marjorie L. DeVault
Publsiher: Temple University Press
Total Pages: 329
Release: 2021
ISBN 10: 9781439901045
ISBN 13: 143990104X
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

A Complex Sorrow Book Review:

In 1988, Marianne Paget published The Unity of Mistakes: A Phenomenological Interpretation of Medical Work (Temple) in which she argued that error is an intrinsic feature of medicine - an experimental and uncertain activity. Her subsequent research focused on medical negligence and on miscommunication and silence as a cause and product of error in medicine. While pursuing her research on negligence, she found out that she was an example of it. Chronic back pain that had been misdiagnosed as muscle spasms turned out to be a symptom of a rare and fatal cancer that claimed Paget's life in December 1989. This collection of her personal and professional writings on the phenomenon of error in medicine chronicles a young scholar's courageous struggle to make sense of a tragic coincidence. Discovering that she was living the charged and painful topic that she had studied so deeply, Paget wrote poignantly and analytically until the last week of her life about this uncanny parallel. "It is very tricky to come to terms with the reality of death without becoming trapped in that reality", wrote "Tracy" Paget to her friends. In this book, she describes "the odd way my life began to mirror my work"; her search for "life rites" when faced with tasks involving wills, last rites, and farewells; and her indomitable and forthright attempt to remain intensely alive in the face of death. A Complex Sorrow, her final project, comprises essays, letters, and a journal recording her last year. Ever critical of the distanced and dispassionate stance taken in much social analysis, Paget had experimented with performance as a form for enlivening social science research. The script for her play, "The Work of Talk",about communication problems between a physician and his cancer patient, is also included. Her compelling life-text speaks to those living with illness and those who care for and about them, as well as to social scientists committed to the investigation and representation of lived experience.

The Beautiful Ones

The Beautiful Ones
Author: Prince
Publsiher: Spiegel & Grau
Total Pages: 288
Release: 2019-10-29
ISBN 10: 039958966X
ISBN 13: 9780399589669
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

The Beautiful Ones Book Review:

#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • The brilliant coming-of-age-and-into-superstardom story of one of the greatest artists of all time, in his own words—featuring never-before-seen photos, original scrapbooks and lyric sheets, and the exquisite memoir he began writing before his tragic death NAMED ONE OF THE BEST MUSIC BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY THE NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW AND ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY THE WASHINGTON POST AND THE GUARDIAN • NOMINATED FOR THE NAACP IMAGE AWARD Prince was a musical genius, one of the most beloved, accomplished, and acclaimed musicians of our time. He was a startlingly original visionary with an imagination deep enough to whip up whole worlds, from the sexy, gritty funk paradise of “Uptown” to the mythical landscape of Purple Rain to the psychedelia of “Paisley Park.” But his most ambitious creative act was turning Prince Rogers Nelson, born in Minnesota, into Prince, one of the greatest pop stars of any era. The Beautiful Ones is the story of how Prince became Prince—a first-person account of a kid absorbing the world around him and then creating a persona, an artistic vision, and a life, before the hits and fame that would come to define him. The book is told in four parts. The first is the memoir Prince was writing before his tragic death, pages that bring us into his childhood world through his own lyrical prose. The second part takes us through Prince’s early years as a musician, before his first album was released, via an evocative scrapbook of writing and photos. The third section shows us Prince’s evolution through candid images that go up to the cusp of his greatest achievement, which we see in the book’s fourth section: his original handwritten treatment for Purple Rain—the final stage in Prince’s self-creation, where he retells the autobiography of the first three parts as a heroic journey. The book is framed by editor Dan Piepenbring’s riveting and moving introduction about his profound collaboration with Prince in his final months—a time when Prince was thinking deeply about how to reveal more of himself and his ideas to the world, while retaining the mystery and mystique he’d so carefully cultivated—and annotations that provide context to the book’s images. This work is not just a tribute to an icon, but an original and energizing literary work in its own right, full of Prince’s ideas and vision, his voice and image—his undying gift to the world.

The Butterfly Effect

The Butterfly Effect
Author: Marcus J. Moore
Publsiher: Simon and Schuster
Total Pages: 288
Release: 2020-10-13
ISBN 10: 198210760X
ISBN 13: 9781982107604
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

The Butterfly Effect Book Review:

This first cultural biography of rap superstar and “master of storytelling” (The New Yorker) Kendrick Lamar explores his meteoric rise to fame and his profound impact on a racially fraught America—perfect for fans of Zack O’Malley Greenburg’s Empire State of Mind. Kendrick Lamar is at the top of his game. The thirteen-time Grammy Award­–winning rapper is just in his early thirties, but he’s already won the Pulitzer Prize for Music, produced and curated the soundtrack of the megahit film Black Panther, and has been named one of Time’s 100 Influential People. But what’s even more striking about the Compton-born lyricist and performer is how he’s established himself as a formidable adversary of oppression and force for change. Through his confessional poetics, his politically charged anthems, and his radical performances, Lamar has become a beacon of light for countless people. Written by veteran journalist and music critic Marcus J. Moore, this is the first biography of Kendrick Lamar. It’s the definitive account of his coming-of-age as an artist, his resurrection of two languishing genres (bebop and jazz), his profound impact on a racially fraught America, and his emergence as the bona fide King of Rap. The Butterfly Effect is the extraordinary, triumphant story of a modern lyrical prophet and an American icon who has given hope to those buckling under the weight of systemic oppression, reminding everyone that through it all—“we gon’ be alright.”

The Changeling

The Changeling
Author: Gail Gallant
Publsiher: Doubleday Canada
Total Pages: 288
Release: 2019-03-26
ISBN 10: 0385686579
ISBN 13: 9780385686570
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

The Changeling Book Review:

In this haunting memoir, Gail Gallant recounts her unbelievable life as a changeling, a child born to replace another. When Gail Gallant was five months old, she died. A year later, she was reborn. Or so her mother said. The crash occurred on a July night in 1955. The truck hit the Gallant family's car head-on; a few weeks later, newborn baby Gail died from her injuries. Mad with grief, her mother prayed feverishly for Gail's return, convinced that God would bring her child back to her. And when she gave birth within a year to a baby girl who looked identical to her lost child, she believed her prayers had been answered. She named that newborn baby Gail. In this haunting memoir about having and losing faith, Gail Gallant recounts her awe-inspiring true story of life as a changeling--a child born to replace her deceased baby sister. A middle child in a large Catholic family, Gail embraced the belief that she was especially anointed, a status that was reinforced by her stern, devout mother and distant, hard-drinking father. Babies sometimes die, after all, but she was the one that God had chosen to bring back to life. Eventually, this special status--the feeling that she had been singled out by God, and just as importantly, by her mother--became a source of secret anxiety for Gail. Doubt began to cast its shadow. As she grew up, questions plagued her: Why did God save her? What did he want in return? And what if she couldn't live up to his--or her mother's--expectations? What if she wasn't so special after all? Or worse, what if she was a mere imposter, only pretending to be the first Gail, whose life she now lived? For this changeling child with a tortured soul, finding her own identity meant wrestling with sainthood and sin alike. As she rewrote her origin story, Gail battled blinding depression and loss of faith. Ultimately, she discovered her own sense of what is extraordinary in becoming simply herself.

The Bright Hour

The Bright Hour
Author: Nina Riggs
Publsiher: Simon and Schuster
Total Pages: 320
Release: 2017-06-06
ISBN 10: 1501169351
ISBN 13: 9781501169359
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

The Bright Hour Book Review:

"Built on her wildly popular Modern Love column, 'When a Couch is More Than a Couch' (9/23/2016), a breathtaking memoir of living meaningfully with 'death in the room' by the 38 year old great-great-great granddaughter of Ralph Waldo Emerson, mother to two young boys, wife of 16 years, after her terminal cancer diagnosis"--

Stopgap

Stopgap
Author: Liam Card
Publsiher: Dundurn
Total Pages: 232
Release: 2016-03-19
ISBN 10: 1459732936
ISBN 13: 9781459732933
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Stopgap Book Review:

Luke’s afterlife is turned upside down when he is asked to mentor Safia, an angry young ghost with the power to rid the world of all violent crimes — leaving a trail of dead criminals in her path. Stopgap is a darkly comic journey to an afterlife where clearly defined rules can’t cover up uneasy shades of grey.

It Could Be Worse You Could Be Me

It Could Be Worse  You Could Be Me
Author: Ariel Leve
Publsiher: Harper Collins
Total Pages: 304
Release: 2010-04-13
ISBN 10: 0061989916
ISBN 13: 9780061989919
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

It Could Be Worse You Could Be Me Book Review:

“Ariel Leve is the love child of David Sedaris and Fran Leibowitz. An original and funny voice…. Insightful and sharp.” — Joan Rivers “Ariel Leve is brilliant and funny and the only other person I know without an oven. Buy this book and keep it close.” — Bill Nighy “Funny, smart, delightfully cranky”(AJ Jacobs) Ariel Leve’s Sunday Times Magazine (London) column “Cassandra” moves to book form. It Could Be Worse, You Could Be Me offers a humorously bleak perspective on life’s potential to turn out badly… and Ariel’s innate ability to put the black cloud into the silver lining. This is a book for schadenfreude aficionados; for readers who identify with Cassandra’s slogan, “worrying is my yoga”; and for fans of Seinfeld, Ugly Betty, Sex & the City, Curb Your Enthusiasm, David Sedaris, Woody Allen, and New Yorker cartoons.

Range

Range
Author: David Epstein
Publsiher: Penguin
Total Pages: 352
Release: 2019-05-28
ISBN 10: 0735214492
ISBN 13: 9780735214491
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Range Book Review:

The #1 New York Times bestseller that has all America talking: as seen/heard on Morning Joe, CBS This Morning, The Bill Simmons Podcast, Rich Roll, and more. Shortlisted for the Financial Times/McKinsey Business Book of the Year Award “The most important business—and parenting—book of the year.” —Forbes “Urgent and important. . . an essential read for bosses, parents, coaches, and anyone who cares about improving performance.” —Daniel H. Pink “So much crucial and revelatory information about performance, success, and education.” —Susan Cain, bestselling author of Quiet “As David Epstein shows us, cultivating range prepares us for the wickedly unanticipated… a well-supported and smoothly written case on behalf of breadth and late starts.” —Wall Street Journal Plenty of experts argue that anyone who wants to develop a skill, play an instrument, or lead their field should start early, focus intensely, and rack up as many hours of deliberate practice as possible. If you dabble or delay, you’ll never catch up to the people who got a head start. But a closer look at research on the world’s top performers, from professional athletes to Nobel laureates, shows that early specialization is the exception, not the rule. David Epstein examined the world’s most successful athletes, artists, musicians, inventors, forecasters and scientists. He discovered that in most fields—especially those that are complex and unpredictable—generalists, not specialists, are primed to excel. Generalists often find their path late, and they juggle many interests rather than focusing on one. They’re also more creative, more agile, and able to make connections their more specialized peers can’t see. Provocative, rigorous, and engrossing, Range makes a compelling case for actively cultivating inefficiency. Failing a test is the best way to learn. Frequent quitters end up with the most fulfilling careers. The most impactful inventors cross domains rather than deepening their knowledge in a single area. As experts silo themselves further while computers master more of the skills once reserved for highly focused humans, people who think broadly and embrace diverse experiences and perspectives will increasingly thrive.

Somebody s Someone

Somebody s Someone
Author: Regina Louise
Publsiher: Grand Central Publishing
Total Pages: 384
Release: 2009-02-28
ISBN 10: 9780446556330
ISBN 13: 0446556335
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Somebody s Someone Book Review:

In this poignant and heart wrenching true story, Regina Louise recounts her childhood search for connection in the face of abuse, neglect, and rejection. What happens to a child when her own parents reject her and sit idly by as others abuse her? In this poignant, heart wrenching debut work, Regina Louise recounts her childhood search for someone to feel connected to. A mother she has never known--but long fantasized about-- deposited her and her half sister at the same group home that she herself fled years before. When another resident beats Regina so badly that she can barely move, she knows that she must leave this terrible place-the only home she knows. Thus begins Regina's fight to survive, utterly alone at the age of 10. A stint living with her mother and her abusive boyfriend is followed by a stay with her father's lily white wife and daughters, who ignore her before turning to abuse and ultimately kicking her out of the house. Regina then tries everything in her search for someone to care for her and to care about, from taking herself to jail to escaping countless foster homes to be near her beloved counselor. Written in her distinctive and unique voice, Regina's story offers an in-depth look at the life of a child who no one wanted. From her initial flight to her eventual discovery of love, your heart will go out to Regina's younger self, and you'll cheer her on as she struggles to be Somebody's Someone.

How to Be Fine

How to Be Fine
Author: Jolenta Greenberg,Kristen Meinzer
Publsiher: HarperCollins
Total Pages: 256
Release: 2020-03-17
ISBN 10: 006295721X
ISBN 13: 9780062957214
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

How to Be Fine Book Review:

A humorous and insightful look into what advice works, what doesn’t, and what it means to transform yourself, by the co-hosts of the popular By the Book podcast. In each episode of their podcast By the Book, Jolenta Greenberg and Kristen Meinzer take a deep dive into a different self-help book, following its specific instructions, rules, and advice to the letter. From diet and productivity to decorating to social interactions, they try it all, record themselves along the way, then share what they’ve learned with their devoted and growing audience of fans who tune in. In How to Be Fine, Jolenta and Kristen synthesize the lessons and insights they’ve learned and share their experiences with everyone. How to Be Fine is a thoughtful look at the books and practices that have worked, real talk on those that didn’t, and a list of philosophies they want to see explored in-depth. The topics they cover include: Getting off your device Engaging in positive self-talk Downsizing Admitting you’re a liar Meditation Going outside Getting in touch with your emotions Seeing a therapist Before they began their podcast, Jolenta wanted to believe the promises of self-help books, while Kristen was very much the skeptic. They embraced their differences of opinion, hoping they’d be good for laughs and downloads. But in the years since launching the By the Book, they’ve come to realize their show is about much more than humor. In fact, reading and following each book’s advice has actually changed and improved their lives. Thanks to the show, Kristen penned the Amish romance novel she’d always joked about writing, traveled back to her past lives, and she broached some difficult conversations with her husband about their marriage. Jolenta finally memorized her husband’s phone number, began tracking her finances, and fell in love with cutting clutter. Part memoir, part prescriptive handbook, this honest, funny, and heartfelt guide is like a warm soul-baring conversation with your closest and smartest friends.

Always Home A Daughter s Recipes Stories

Always Home  A Daughter s Recipes   Stories
Author: Fanny Singer
Publsiher: Appetite by Random House
Total Pages: 336
Release: 2020-03-31
ISBN 10: 0147530849
ISBN 13: 9780147530844
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Always Home A Daughter s Recipes Stories Book Review:

A memoir about growing up as the daughter of culinary legend Alice Waters: a story of food, family, figuring out who you are, and the bond between a daughter and mother. In this extraordinarily intimate portrait of her mother--and herself--Fanny Singer, daughter of revered food icon and activist Alice Waters, chronicles two lives through food. Across dozens of vignettes with accompanying recipes, she shares the story of her own culinary coming of age, and reveals a side of her legendary mother that has never been seen before. A charming, smart translation of Alice Waters' ideals and attitudes about food for a new generation, Always Home is a loving but unsentimental look at a life in food.

Child of the Heart

Child of the Heart
Author: Bernice Willms
Publsiher: Eirene Publishing
Total Pages: 578
Release: 2013-10-15
ISBN 10: 9780991064519
ISBN 13: 0991064518
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Child of the Heart Book Review:

Freddy is torn between her need for a normal adolescent dating life and the responsibility she has always felt for her mentally challenged Uncle Joey. When Joey is accused of the murder of a local 6 year old girl, Freddy works to clear his name. But can she accomplish this without alienating the man she loves? A real page-turner; you will be riveted to the mystery as well as the circuitous paths Freddy's love life takes on her way to maturity. An excellent choice for a book club!

Little Panic

Little Panic
Author: Amanda Stern
Publsiher: Hachette UK
Total Pages: 416
Release: 2018-06-19
ISBN 10: 1538711915
ISBN 13: 9781538711910
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Little Panic Book Review:

In the vein of bestselling memoirs about mental illness like Andrew Solomon's Noonday Demon, Sarah Hepola's Blackout, and Daniel Smith's Monkey Mind comes a gorgeously immersive, immediately relatable, and brilliantly funny memoir about living life on the razor's edge of panic. The world never made any sense to Amanda Stern--how could she trust time to keep flowing, the sun to rise, gravity to hold her feet to the ground, or even her own body to work the way it was supposed to? Deep down, she knows that there's something horribly wrong with her, some defect that her siblings and friends don't have to cope with. Growing up in the 1970s and 80s in New York, Amanda experiences the magic and madness of life through the filter of unrelenting panic. Plagued with fear that her friends and family will be taken from her if she's not watching-that her mother will die, or forget she has children and just move away-Amanda treats every parting as her last. Shuttled between a barefoot bohemian life with her mother in Greenwich Village, and a sanitized, stricter world of affluence uptown with her father, Amanda has little she can depend on. And when Etan Patz disappears down the block from their MacDougal Street home, she can't help but believe that all her worst fears are about to come true. Tenderly delivered and expertly structured, Amanda Stern's memoir is a document of the transformation of New York City and a deep, personal, and comedic account of the trials and errors of seeing life through a very unusual lens.

Living Into Leadership

Living Into Leadership
Author: Bowen H. McCoy
Publsiher: Stanford University Press
Total Pages: 212
Release: 2007
ISBN 10: 9780804755764
ISBN 13: 0804755760
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Living Into Leadership Book Review:

A Journey in Ethics is a testimonial to living an engaged yet balanced business life and sustaining your core values.

Bitter Fame

Bitter Fame
Author: Anne Stevenson,Lucas Myers
Publsiher: Unknown
Total Pages: 413
Release: 1990
ISBN 10: 9780140103731
ISBN 13: 0140103732
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Bitter Fame Book Review:

A biography of the American poet Sylvia Plath which presents a different view of her life and death by shifting any blame away from Plath's husband, Ted Hughes, and suggesting the problems lay in her personality difficulties.